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4May/1125

Apple iPad Review Teil 6: iBooks, Karten


Ipad ebook:Apple iPad Review Teil 6: iBooks, Karten
Zwei Highlights in einem Video: Kann das iPad als Ebook-Reader überzeugen und ist die Maps-Applikation genauso gut wie auf der Keynote? Website: knappknack.wordpress.com Twitter: twitter.com ICQ: 581340444 Skype: Knappknack Bewerten und Kommentieren!!!


4May/110

Book Review: Capitolio by Christopher Anderson|Lastest Ipad News]

Book Review: Capitolio by Christopher Anderson
The first photobook specifically designed for iPad and iPhone makes even this book collector fondly anticipate the next digital photobook.
Read more on Blogcritics.org


29Apr/1125

Phosphor E-Ink Watch Review


Kindle ebook:Phosphor E-Ink Watch Review
Thanks a ton to Phosphor for sending out this awesome watch for me to review for you guys! They have a ton of different E-Ink watches online so show them some love and check out their website with the link below! :D Phosphor: www.phosphorwatches.com Watch: www.phosphorwatches.com Thank you guys so much for watching this video and supporting me! Don't forget to Thumbs up as well as drop me a comment below! Also feel free to subscribe if you are new to my videos so you can be updated on when they come out! Also follow me on twitter for updates to my videos and other random stuff! Also tweet out a link to all your followers, It helps me gain new subscribers and friends! :) Twitter: www.twitter.com


25Apr/1125

EEVblog #108 – Amazon Kindle 3 3G GSM/WiFi Review


Kindle ebook:EEVblog #108 - Amazon Kindle 3 3G GSM/WiFi Review
Dave unboxes and reviews the new Amazon Kindle 3 3rd Generation 3G GSM/WiFi Ebook reader. What superlatives can he find for the new E-Ink display? And what happens to the E-Ink display when you put it in the thermal chamber? Want to buy one?: www.amazon.com

25Apr/1112

Kindle 3 Video Review


Kindle ebook:Kindle 3 Video Review
A little video review of the Kindle I just bought. I love it to bits! It's the international edition. Hope you guys like it! Also this was sort of a test with a new camera of mine, a Pentax K7. Perhaps I'll do more DDT's with it, depends on whether I can get a tripod soon.

25Apr/110

Good e-Reader Radio – Week in Review – April 18th to April 25th 2011

Apr

25

By Michael Koz

goodereader radio

In this edition of the Good e-Reader Radio Show we give you the quintessential week in review! If you had a busy week due to Easter Weekend family meetings or if you went on vacation you might have missed a ton of news! We sum up the most essential stories of the week so you can stay on top of the world of e-Readers, eBooks, Digital Publishing and Tablet PC’s.

In e-reader news this week we talk about the new Amazon Store in Germany and how local German authors can make money online selling their works to their fellow countryman. We also get into the new iRiver Story HD that arrived at the FCC and what you can expect out of the device. The Barnes and Noble Nook Color, which proved to be one of the most exciting devices last year is in store for a firmware update, hopefully today. This will give you a chance to access a custom built App Market! When you tap into this new store you can get free and paid applications and greatly enhance your e-reader. Want to knock over some pigs with some very Angry Birds? Want to have Adobe Flash? You will get this an more with the update coming soon!

In Tablet news we talk about how Best Buy is supposed to get an increased allotment of iPad 2′s to meet ravenous demand. We also go into detail about the HTC Flyer, the AT&T version of the Motorola Xoom and the Blackberry Playbook.

Finally we wrap the show up with a preview of next months eBooks coming out and give you some details on our next upcoming show! This will be a very special edition of the Good e-Reader Radio show, where we give independent authors advice on how to promote your digital eBooks.

Related posts:

  1. Good e-Reader Radio – Week in Review, eBook Previews and Bad Android Tablets
  2. Goodereader.com Radio Show – Motorola Xoom – iPad 2 and week in review
  3. Goodereader Week in Review – Ebook – e-Reader and Tablet News
  4. Good E-Reader Radio Show April 25
  5. GoodeReader Radio Show – Week in Review Edition
  6. Good E-Reader Radio Show April 30
Categories : e-reader, e-Reader News, E-Reader Radio, Tablet PC News, Technology, Week in Review
24Apr/110

Len Edgerly interviews editor of NY Times Book Review: he uses a Kindle

Download

Got this email from Len.  Haven’t had time to listen to the interview, but I certainly will during the week:

Paul, I had an informative interview with Tanenhaus about how he sees the e-book revolution from his vantage point as editor of the New York Times Book Review.  The interview is about a half an hour, in the latest episode of The Kindle Chronicles, released last night. I interviewed him on 4/15 by Skype and phone.

It turns out he’s been reading on a Kindle for two years, mainly for books he uses in researching his own books, because he values the notes and highlights capability.  He sees the power of Kindle Singles to give a new and profitable outlet to long-form journalism and said Amazon approached him to create a Kindle Singles version of an article he’d written last year about Sarah Palin, but he didn’t have time for the project and turned it down.  He says the Book Review has not yet reviewed a book available only in e-book form, but he’s sure it will happen some day and they have no rule against it.  He also spoke about general book-review topics, including his personal commitment not to give a humiliating review to the first book of a promising new writer.

Anyway, I thought you might be interested in it.

Show notes: http://www.thekindlechronicles.com/2011/04/23/tkc-144-sam-tanenhaus/

Audio file: http://traffic.libsyn.com/theedgeoftheroad/TKC_144_Sam_Tanenhaus_final.mp3

Best, Len

24Apr/110

Len Edgerly interviews editor of NY Times Book Review: he uses a Kindle

Download

Got this email from Len.  Haven’t had time to listen to the interview, but I certainly will during the week:

Paul, I had an informative interview with Tanenhaus about how he sees the e-book revolution from his vantage point as editor of the New York Times Book Review.  The interview is about a half an hour, in the latest episode of The Kindle Chronicles, released last night. I interviewed him on 4/15 by Skype and phone.

It turns out he’s been reading on a Kindle for two years, mainly for books he uses in researching his own books, because he values the notes and highlights capability.  He sees the power of Kindle Singles to give a new and profitable outlet to long-form journalism and said Amazon approached him to create a Kindle Singles version of an article he’d written last year about Sarah Palin, but he didn’t have time for the project and turned it down.  He says the Book Review has not yet reviewed a book available only in e-book form, but he’s sure it will happen some day and they have no rule against it.  He also spoke about general book-review topics, including his personal commitment not to give a humiliating review to the first book of a promising new writer.

Anyway, I thought you might be interested in it.

Show notes: http://www.thekindlechronicles.com/2011/04/23/tkc-144-sam-tanenhaus/

Audio file: http://traffic.libsyn.com/theedgeoftheroad/TKC_144_Sam_Tanenhaus_final.mp3

Best, Len

22Apr/110

Review of the Blackberry Playbook

The Playbook is the first tablet from Canadian based Research in Motion. They have had a long standing tradition to focus on enterprise level hardware in the form of smartphones and deliver strong email access. The Playbook marks the companies first foray into the realms of Tablet PC’s. Does it deliver the goods or is it worse then the Storm?


Hardware

The Blackberry Playbook has a 7 inch capacitive touchscreen with gesture support. There are no physical buttons on the unit other then the power and volume buttons. This means to interact with any of the menus, or programs depends totally on sweeping your finger access the screen in many different ways. The display resolution is very solid at 1024×600 and runs on a 1 GHZ Cortex A9 dual core processor. It has 1 GB of ram which makes multitasking applications very snappy.

There are three different models of the initial offering of the RIM Playbook, 16 GB, 32 GB and 64 GB. The cost is depending on what model you want to go for. Right now, it does not have SD card support, so you cannot enhance the built in memory with one.

It has dual HD cameras, one on the back of the device which is 5 MP and the front facing 3 MP, which supports 1080P HD video recording. Speaking of video, it plays back 1080P HD video with the H.264, MPEG, DIVX and WMV formats. I found the cameras on the Playbook to be quite excellent! The rear facing one is a pleasure to use and does not bog you down with a ton of settings and options to get the best shot. It also shoots both still images and video, so you can do either or and view your content via the Photo or Video Application. The front facing camera is very respectable. Most tablets, including the iPad 2 have abysmal front facing cameras, often less then 1.0 mega pixel. Since the Playbook has 3, you get very good quality video. This will really help with video conferencing software for important meetings or to chat with friends.

Audio playback is done with the stereo speakers and will support MP3, AAC, and WMA formats.  The speakers themselves are on both sides of the screen and are front facing. This is such a big deal, most people have overlooked when they have evaluated the Playbook. Most tablets such as the Motorola Xoom, iPad 2 and many more all have rear facing speakers. This makes it very hard to get good audio quality when you are cradling it in your lap or if you are laying down and using it. Often the speakers and sound gets very muffled. The Playbook gets audio on tablets right on, by having the 1 speaker on the left and right hand side of the screens. This insures crystal clear audio at all times and was a tremendous boon in comparison to the competition.

The Playbook comes with a wall charger used to power the device and has a Micro USB connector in order to charge the device. You also get a Micro USB connector so you can get your Playbook happening on your PC to transfer media back and fourth. If multimedia is your thing, it has a Mini HDMI port to plug it into your media units to play full 1080p videos.

The Playbook aesthetically is a slick piece of hardware. It feels very elegant and the build quality is very high. Since it is only 7 inches it basically fits in your pocket and is easily transportable. Most of the times when I check out 6 or 7 inch tablets they feel a little bit square and are not that easily transportable. The Playbook feels more like a rectangle and seems to fit in your back pocket with ease.

Software

The Playbook uses the QNX operating system that RIM had purchased last year. The first model to use this new operating system was the Blackberry Torch, which is a staple device for many people in the tech industry.

QNX is a robust operating system and really shines on the Playbook. It handles true multi-tasking very well and I found the device never lagged, no matter how many programs I had open. Although the lag was non-existent I did find many different ways to crash the device, such as going to Google Maps.

There are many bundled applications that come with the device such as Facebook, Twitter, Gmail, Yahoo, Aol Mail and so on. These “applications” are not TRUE applications but basically short cuts to open the web browser to launch their webpage counterparts.

Lets firstly look at the web browser and the entire internet experience. Firstly to start you need a WIFI connection. If you are not in a WIFI area but have a Blackberry phone you can “Tether” the device and use your phones 3G connection for your Playbook to access the internet. This is done via bluetooth and not all service provides allow this service. Recently AT&T had axed this capability due to rising data usage bogging down its network.

The Web browser is very solid, web pages load very fast and you have the ability to have tabs. This is sort of like the Safari version of tabs where you click on the tab button and see real time images of what is happening in your different windows. There is also an Options menu that you can turn off Javascript, Flash and other things. You can even enable full privacy browsing, so you can prevent cookies from caching on your unit and be mostly anonymous. Sometimes when you are browsing a site, reading a blog or checking out videos or a web comic you can simply turn the entire navigation bar off with a click of a button. This is the equivalent of full screen mode, which many tablets seem to lack this basic functionality.

Really, the internet experience on the Playbook is very excellent. It does HTML 5, Adobe Flash and Javascript, which means the entire internet is at your fingertips without having to make compromises.

One of the things I liked the best about the internet experience on the Playbook was the robust pinching and zooming feature on webpages. It rivaled or surpassed the iPad in terms of fluid zooming. The keyboard also is one of the best aspects and is very evident during your overall web experience. Whether you are typing domain names, search terms or filling in fields the keyboard is  better then the Android version.

The Playbook did not launch with a ton of applications to really make it stand out against the avalanche of Android tablets. Some things you get which are reliable staples of a computing experience is your Music Player that displays cover art and allows for a great music experience. You can create play lists but does not have any kind of EQ to manage your sound levels.

Some of the unique applications found on the device are compliments of third parties that signed deals with RIM as content distribution partners. Kobo has made its own version of the Kobo ecosystem for the Playbook so you can easily download 1.3 million books, newspapers and magazines directly to your unit.

If books are not your thing (what are you doing on goodereader!) you can purchase music via 7 Digital. The 7 Digital music application is actually better designed for the Playbook then it was for the Samsung Galaxy Tab.

Of course there is the ubiquitousvideo player, word and excel to go, calculator, slacker radio and a few others. Most of the applications are really nothing to write home about.

One of the highly touted features of the Playbook throughout its entire development cycle was the new version of Blackberry App World. App World is the portal in which you download games, applications, wallpapers and other content and deliver it right to your device. The Playbook version of the App Store is quite different from the same one you have accessed with your Blackberry Phone. I noticed the selection of apps is terrible and most again seem like short cuts to websites or RSS Readers. There is very few quality apps or games available. There is no official Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare or anything else as of press time.

While we are on the subject of applications, someone has to be said with the missing essentials. The Playbook did not ship with Contacts, E-Mail, Blackberry Messenger, Enterprise email or any of the quintessential elements that propelled RIM into being the company of choice for the business crowd. They basically tried to rush the device out to the market too fast and are relying on future firmware updates to address these problems. If you are an early adapter you are in luck, there are workarounds.

Blackberry made some new software called “Bridge.” If you have an existing Blackberry phone such as the Torch you can have your Playbook display a unique barcode that you scan with your phone. It then takes you to Blackberry App World where you can download the Bridge application to your phone. The tricky part is syncing your phone with your tablet which takes a bit of patience. With some screen prompts you basically scan another barcode to enter your Playbooks unique signature into your phone and establish a connection between your Playbook and phone. Once you do this your Playbook will display a new category on the menu called Bridge. This will allow  you to access your Blackberry Email, Contacts, Calender, Tasks and even the SD card on your phone. If you make any new contacts, or make a new task it will then sync with your phone and appear on it as well.

What I found cool about this whole process is that you only need to do it once and when your Playbook and phone are in proximity of each other, the relationship will always be established. This makes the long term maintenance a little bit easier to mange because you do not have to manually sync or turn anything on or off.

Having the Blackberry Bridge software has been the saving grace for early adapters to be able to access your essential Blackberry services via your phone.

RIM recently announced that they will be incorporating Google Android applications into the pipeline of the Playbook soon. What this means is that you will be able to run most Android apps on your Playbook! Dispite the Playbook not having Android as the core OS like most tablets, it is adapting the functionality to install common applications and games. Angry Birds Seasons here we come.

Our Prospective of the Playbook

I love Blackberry! I have been using their phones since they really started making them and have upgraded to around seven different phones during various upgrade cycles. There is some mystical allure about Blackberries that somehow brings a comradely amidst people. It was the same kind of charm when the Kindle came out or the iPad 1 first dropped. If you saw someone with one, you instantly could just talk with them and get along. Blackberry felt like the same kind of company. Blackberries certainty are not for everyone, but the people who love them, LOVE them. I really want this tablet to succeed because there is lots of room in the market for a more business tablet, rather then just all of the consumer ones you see inundating the market place.

I mainly use my Blackberry Phone because of the Push and secure email system, really its second to none in the world of mobile email. The enterprise level of email delivery is very well unparalleled and the big draw with doing business with RIM to begin with. It is really too bad that the unit did not ship with basic RIM delivered email functionality. Although I can access email via the Bridge application you can’t do simple things like “delete all prior” and other quickly managed short cuts.

The applications that come bundled with the Playbook are the largest shortcomings of the device. Sure you have the essentials such as Music, Video, Web Browsing, and Documents to Go but there are no great applications that blow you away. The App World is a baron wasteland of content that is worse then finding a needle in the Mojave Dessert. Its nice that it comes bundled with Adobe Reader for PDF files, but if you are reading ebooks and not technical manuals the whole page turning and refresh rate is very poor. If you want to read on this device you are basically out of luck. Besides Kobo there are no other reading applications at all. You cannot get any of the other companies such as Barnes and Noble, Amazon, Sony. There is not even independent programs you can get that will display ePub books that you load on the device yourself.

The Playbook is a slick piece of technology and I love the gesture support in the absence of physical buttons. Their UI is very intuitive and once you figure our the gestures necessary to enter multitasking mode, exit, and other functions it becomes second nature and suddenly pressing buttons seems so passe.

Really the Playbook is a great piece of technology, it is currently my new favorite 7 inch tablet in terms of raw power, a unique OS and delivers a superior user experience. It feels very good to carry around and hold, does not weigh too much and looks like a high end piece of hardware.

My hope is that Blackberry issues many firmwares to fix the integration of essential services and features as demanded by their devote following. This limitation is what is holding it back from getting distribution deals from companies like Verizon which don’t see it as a viable gadget or AT&T which blocks Bridge.

The Pros

Build Quality

Solid Internal Components

Web Browsing

Fluid Multitasking

Cons

Poor Quality of bundled Apps

No email, Calender, Contact List, Blackberry Instant Messenger

App World is devoid of anything of value

HULU and other streaming services don’t work

Rank 7.5/10

Related posts:

  1. Blackberry Bridge software for the PlayBook blocked by AT&T
  2. Blackberry Playbook now on Sale in Canada
  3. Blackberry Playbook developer portal for App World is Live!
  4. Unboxing the Blackberry Playbook
  5. Blackberry hooks up Developers with a free Playbook
  6. BlackBerry PlayBook to come loaded with video conferencing app
22Apr/110

“New York Review of Books” magazine now on the Kindle

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Good news for booklovers.  The Kindle Daily Post has an interview with the Review’s editor and co-founder, Robert Silver.  Here’s the first question:

Q: How would you describe the mission of the New York Review? How is it different from other magazines, other book reviews?

A: The New York Review started in February 1963, thanks to a long strike by typographers against the New York Times, leaving publishers desperate because there were no reviews of their books. At Harper’s Magazine, where I was an editor, I had published a controversial article by Elizabeth Hardwick, wife of Robert Lowell, saying that book reviewing was in a miserable state and something different was needed.

Then Jason Epstein, who was then an editor at Random House, called and said the Times strike made it possible to start a new review without a penny, since all the publishers would have to take ads. His wife Barbara and I started planning an issue along with Elizabeth Hardwick. And within a few weeks such writers as Mary McCarthy, Norman Mailer, William Styron, Robert Lowell, W.H. Auden and many others were willing to stop what they were doing and deliver a book review in three weeks without payment, all to show what a new book review could be like. It sold out and we had about a thousand letters asking us to continue, and we were on our way to setting up the paper that’s been going on these 48 years.

You can find the subscription here.  It’s only .49 a month for the bi-weekly magazine.

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