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11Mar/110

The National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program 2010 Report

Screen shot 2011 03 11 at 10 36 02 AM

From Digital Koans:

The Library of Congress has released Preserving Our Digital Heritage: The National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program 2010 Report.

Here’s an excerpt from the press release:


It documents the achievements of the Library of Congress and its NDIIPP partners working together to create sustainable long-term access to digital materials.

Since NDIIPP was founded in 2000 by an act of Congress, a network of over 185 partners in 44 states and 25 countries have developed a distributed technical infrastructure, preserved over 1400 at-risk collections, and have made strides to support a legal environment conducive to digital preservation.

The report describes a decade of action in digital preservation and outlays the short- and long-term plans to ensure libraries, archives and other heritage institutions in the United States can collect and provide long-term access to the resources of the 21st Century, and beyond.

1Mar/110

Internet Archive’s Brewster Kahle talks about the In-Library Lending Program, by Sue Polanka

nsr_cover.jpg

Last week the Internet Archive announced the launch of a traditional In-Library Lending model for a pooled collection of over 80,000 eBooks.  The program, available on openlibrary.org, provides access to the ebooks through a web browser and download technology.  I had a chance to interview Brewster about the new program in my NSR audio interviews.  The full press release on the In-Library Lending program is available at the Internet Archive.


The interview with Brewster is also available on the NSR interviews page, along with about 35 others.

22Feb/110

Internet Archive launches in-library ebook lending program

From the Internet Archive Blog (blockquotes omitted):

San Francisco, CA – Today, a group of libraries led by the Internet Archive announced a new, cooperative 80,000+ eBook lending collection of mostly 20th century books on OpenLibrary.org, a site where it’s already possible to read over 1 million eBooks without restriction. During a library visit, patrons with an OpenLibrary.org account can borrow any of these lendable eBooks using laptops, reading devices or library computers. This new twist on the traditional lending model could increase eBook use and revenue for publishers.

intospacewiththeastronauts.jpg

“As readers go digital, so are our libraries,” said Brewster Kahle, founder and Digital Librarian of the Internet Archive. “It’s fabulous to work with such a great group of 150 forward-thinking libraries.” (See the list of participating libraries below.)


This new digital lending system will enable patrons of participating libraries to read books in a web browser. “In Silicon Valley, iPads and other reading devices are hugely popular. Our partnership with the Internet Archive and OpenLibrary.org is crucial to achieving our mission – to meet the reading needs of our library visitors and our community,” said Linda Crowe, Executive Director of the Peninsula Library System.

A recent survey of libraries across North America was conducted by Unisphere Research and Information Today, Inc. (ITI). It reported that of the 1,201 libraries canvassed, 73% are seeing increased demand for digital resources with 67% reporting increased demand for wireless access and 62% seeing a surge in demand for web access.

American libraries spend -4 billion each year on publishers’ products. “I’m not suggesting we spend less, I am suggesting we spend smarter by buying and lending more eBooks,” asserts Kahle. He is also encouraging libraries worldwide to join in the expansion of this pool of purchased and digitized eBooks so their patrons can borrow from this larger collection.

How it Works

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Any OpenLibrary.org account holder can borrow up to 5 eBooks at a time, for up to 2 weeks. Books can only be borrowed by one person at a time. People can choose to borrow either an in-browser version (viewed using the Internet Archive’s BookReader web application), or a PDF or ePub version, managed by the free Adobe Digital Editions software. This new technology follows the lead of the Google eBookstore, which sells books from many publishers to be read using Google’s books-in-browsers technology. Readers can use laptops, library computers and tablet devices including the iPad.

What Participating Libraries Are Saying
The reasons for joining the initiative vary from library to library. Judy Russell, Dean of University Libraries at the University of Florida, said, “We have hundreds of books that are too brittle to circulate. This digitize-and-lend system allows us to provide access to these older books without endangering the physical copy.”

Digital lending also offers wider access to one-of-a-kind or rare books on specific topics such as family histories – popular with genealogists. This pooled collection will enable libraries like the Boston Public Library and the Allen County Public Library in Indiana to share their materials with genealogists around the state, the country and the world.

“Genealogists are some of our most enthusiastic users, and the Boston Public Library holds some genealogy books that exist nowhere else,” said Amy E. Ryan, President of the Boston Public Library. “This lending system allows our users to search for names in these books for the first time, and allows us to efficiently lend some of these books to visitors at distant libraries.”

“Reciprocal sharing of genealogy resources is crucial to family history research. The Allen County Public Library owns the largest public genealogy collection in the country, and we want to make our resources available to as many people as possible. Our partnership in this initiative offers us a chance to reach a wider audience,” said Jeffrey Krull, director of the Allen County Public Library.
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Publishers selling their eBooks to participating libraries include Cursor and OR Books. Books purchased will be lent to readers as well as being digitally preserved for the long-term. This continues the traditional relationship and services offered by publishers and libraries.

“Libraries are our allies in creating the best range of discovery mechanisms for writers and readers—enabling open and browser-based lending through the Internet Archive means more books for more readers, and we’re thrilled to do our part in achieving that,” said Richard Nash, founder of Cursor.

John Oakes, founder of OR Books said, “We’re always on the lookout for innovative solutions to solve the conundrum of contemporary publishing, and we are excited to learn about the Internet Archive’s latest project. For us, it’s a way to extend our reach to the crucial library market. We look forward to the results. ”

For More Information
Here are a few eBooks that are only available to people in participating libraries.
Libraries interested in partnering in this program should contact: [email protected]
To use this service, please visit a participating library: www.openlibrary.org.
For a list of participating libraries, see below.

###

List of Participating Libraries

Aboite Branch Library, Allen County Public Library
Dupont Branch Library, Allen County Public Library
Georgetown Branch Library, Allen County Public Library
Grabill Branch Library, Allen County Public Library
Hessen Cassel Branch Library, Allen County Public Library
Little Turtle Branch Library, Allen County Public Library
Main Library, Allen County Public Library
Monroeville Branch Library, Allen County Public Library
New Haven Branch Library, Allen County Public Library
Pontiac Branch Library, Allen County Public Library
Shawnee Branch Library, Allen County Public Library
Tecumseh Branch Library, Allen County Public Library
Waynedale Branch Library, Allen County Public Library
Woodburn Branch Library, Allen County Public Library
Adams Street Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Brighton Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Charlestown Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Codman Square Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Connolly Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Dudley Branch Library, Boston Public Library
East Boston Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Egleston Square Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Faneuil Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Fields Corner Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Grove Hall Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Honan-Allston Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Hyde Park Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Jamaica Plain Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Lower Mills Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Mattapan Branch Library, Boston Public Library
North End Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Orient Heights Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Parker Hill Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Roslindale Branch Library, Boston Public Library
South Boston Branch Library, Boston Public Library
South End Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Uphams Corner Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Washington Village Branch Library, Boston Public Library
West End Branch Library, Boston Public Library
West Roxbury Branch Library, Boston Public Library
Internet Archive
MBLWHOI Library, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Atherton Library, Atherton, California
Bay Shore Library, Daly City, California
Belmont Library, Belmont, California
Brisbane Library, Brisbane, California
Burlingame Public Library, Burlingame, California
Burlingame Library Easton Branch, Burlingame, California
Cañada College Library, Redwood City, California
College of San Mateo Library, San Mateo, California
East Palo Alto Library, East Palo Alto, California
Fair Oaks Library, Redwood City, California
Foster City Library, Foster City, California
Grand Avenue Branch Library, South San Francisco, California
Half Moon Bay Library, Half Moon Bay, California
Hillsdale Branch Library, San Mateo, California
John Daly Library, Daly City, California
Marina Public Library, San Mateo, California
Menlo Park Library, Menlo Park, California
Menlo Park Library Belle Haven Branch, Menlo Park, California
Millbrae Library, Millbrae, California
Pacifica Sanchez Library, Pacifica, California
Pacifica Sharp Park Library, Pacifica, California
Portola Valley Library, Portola Valley, California
Redwood City Public Library, Redwood City, California
Redwood Shores Branch Library, Redwood City, California
San Bruno Library, San Bruno, California
San Carlos Library, San Carlos, California
San Mateo Public Library, San Mateo, California
Schaberg Library, Redwood City, California
Serramonte Main Library, Daly City, California
Skyline College Library, San Bruno, California
South San Francisco Public Library, South San Francisco, California
Westlake Library, Daly City, California
Woodside Library, Woodside, California
Anza Branch, San Francisco Public Library
Bayview/Anna E. Waden Branch, San Francisco Public Library
Bernal Heights, San Francisco Public Library
Chinatown/Him Mark Lai Branch, San Francisco Public Library
Eureka Valley/Harvey Milk Memorial Branch, San Francisco Public Library
Excelsior, San Francisco Public Library
Glen Park Branch, San Francisco Public Library
Golden Gate Valley Branch, San Francisco Public Library
Ingleside Branch, San Francisco Public Library
San Francisco Public Library, Main
Marina, San Francisco Public Library
Merced Branch Library, San Francisco Public Library
Mission, San Francisco Public Library
Mission Bay, San Francisco Public Library
Noe Valley/Sally Brunn Branch, San Francisco Public Library
North Beach Branch, San Francisco Public Library
Ocean View, San Francisco Public Library
Ortega, San Francisco Public Library
Park Branch, San Francisco Public Library
Parkside, San Francisco Public Library
Portola Branch, San Francisco Public Library
Potrero Branch, San Francisco Public Library
Presidio Branch, San Francisco Public Library
Richmond/Senator Milton Marks Branch, San Francisco Public Library
Sunset, San Francisco Public Library
Visitacion Valley, San Francisco Public Library
West Portal, San Francisco Public Library
Western Addition, San Francisco Public Library
The Urban School of San Francisco
Augustana Campus Library, University of Alberta
Bibliothèque Saint-Jean (BSJ), University of Alberta
Cameron Library, University of Alberta
Herbert T. Coutts (Education & Physical Education) Library, University of Alberta
Rutherford Library, University of Alberta
John A. Weir Memorial Law Library, University of Alberta
John W. Scott Health Sciences Library, University of Alberta
Winspear Business Reference Library, University of Alberta
Architecture and Fine Arts Library, University of Florida
Education Library, University of Florida
Health Science Center Library, University of Florida
Borland Library, University of Florida
Veterinary Medicine Reading Room, University of Florida
Allen H. Neuharth Journalism and Communications Library, University of Florida
Library West, University of Florida
Marston Science Library, University of Florida
Mead Library, University of Florida
Music Library, University of Florida
Smathers Library (East), University of Florida
Robarts Library, University of Toronto
Gerstein Science Information Centre, University of Toronto
Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, Victoria University
E J Pratt Library, Victoria University
Emmanuel College Library, Victoria University

25Jan/110

The Amazon Trade-in Program – 3 stores – Update

THE AMAZON TRADE-IN PROGRAM
This includes Movies & TV, Paper Books and Textbooks, Video Games


In general, the program enables customers to send in items to a third-party merchant in exchange for an Amazon.com Gift Card.

Amazon's Trade-in Program enables you to send in items to a third party merchant in exchange for an Amazon.com Gift Card and includes DVDs, Blu-ray discs, or HDDVDs; eligible used books and college textbooks matching editions wanted and which are in good condition; and video games in good working condition.

USED BOOKS (Paper)
Plus a side note on the book highlighted in Amazon's current ad for that

I personally didn't realize Amazon has a trade-in program for used paper books.  The current Amazon used-book ad (see image at top left here) happens to show a more unusual book that I actually bought (there is no Kindle version): Island: Poetry and History of Chinese Immigrants on Angel Island, 1910-1940.

  This was during the years when The Chinese Exclusion Act was in effect.

  There are side-notes explaining references made in most of the poems (translated to English), interesting historical photographs, and some memories from some who made it through and later became citizens.

  For the few who might be interested in what that era and place was like for those getting off the boats and onto the West Coast's equivalent of Ellis Island, I made a recent photo gallery (Intro here) of a day spent visiting Angel Island's newly restored Immigration Station detention barracks, where the Chinese immigrants were, by design, held much longer (weeks or months or even two years, instead of 2 days) until they could answer questions satisfactorily or be sent home, and it was found that many of the men carved poems of dispair on the walls, which were often painted over.

  Some of the carvings (discovered one night in an inspection by Park Ranger Alexander Weiss touring the barracks with a flashlight) are now on display, with many of them reproduced and translated in this book along with history of the time, place, and of some of the people involved.  The intro to my photo-set, linked above, leads to the full photo gallery, for those interested in the exhibition of life in the barracks.

  The detention areas were restored only a couple of years ago as a historical exhibition of the immigration station, which was on, ironically, a quite beautiful island.  At least one current docent in his 80s entered the U.S. as a child during that time when relatives of many of us arrived at the Station with their parents.

The rated "Most Helpful" customer review of the book gives a good synopsis, while the first poem he cites reminds me of how many of us use our Kindles today.

BACK TO THE AMAZON TRADING PROGRAM
For more information, see the Help pages listed on Trade-in Program home page and visit the following Trade-In stores for:

  . Movies & TV
  . Textbooks and
  . Video Games.

Here's the Trade-in Program FAQ

STUDENTS AND TEXTBOOKS
I'm not sure many students and parents are aware of this program.  Amazon recently sent out an email on this that included: "Students, no matter where you bought your textbooks you can get up to 60% back when you sell them at Amazon.com's Book & Textbook Buyback Store."

IF ONLY
If only Amazon and the publishers would add a trade-in program for Kindle books...
  (Coming to my mind from a Beatles song right now:
    You can say, I'm a dreamer... but I'm not the only one...)

On-topic note about the Kindle
In the meantime, you might enjoy the latest online newspaper column of the "No Kindle for me!" type.  Laura Moyer rightly worries about the effect of the Kindle on brick and morter bookstores.

Kindle 3's   (UK: Kindle 3's),   DX Graphite


Check often: Temporarily-free late-listed non-classics or recently published ones
  Guide to finding Free Kindle books and Sources.  Top 100 free bestsellers.
UK-Only: recently published non-classics, bestsellers, or highest-rated ones
    Also, UK customers should see the UK store's Top 100 free bestsellers.

19Jan/110

Kno Announces Student Ambassador program

kno student ambassador

Kno recently has developed a few different models of its new educational tablet such as its 14.1 inch dual or single screen edition. The company stands for Knowledge and its firmly set to integrate its technology in the classroom. The company is now taking a direct hand in grooming the kids of today for the jobs of tomorrow by offering students who have demonstrated a passion for education and technology an opportunity to get real-world training and experience via its Student Ambassador program.

Kno will be giving big discounts for students who enter and are accepted into the new program. The student Ambassador program allows students to get access to the brains of the Kno executives, attend exclusive webcasts, entrepreneurship lessons and create social media campaigns.

Kno is intergrating the students into helping further enhance its ecosystem both online and in the class room. The company really wants to give the students a chance to determine the social media aspect of Kno and will help with practical real world career building exercises.

“College students are the future leaders of America and we want to help them gain real-life experience that they can use after college to help them have a successful career,” said David Straus, Vice President of Product at Kno, Inc.  “The Kno Ambassador Program also provides an opportunity for the company to interact directly with students and gain useful insight for the continued development of the Kno education platform.”

If you are keen on entering this new program you can apply via the Kno Website (http://blog.kno.com) and submit your resume. After the resume process you will have to answer some skill testing questions and be interviewed by the Kno development team to see if this is the right fit for you. Finally, we noticed a Survey Monkey posting that Kno has done, check it out HERE.

Related posts:

  1. The NOOKdeveloper program by Barnes and Noble
  2. Dual Screen Kno Tablet priced at 9
  3. Copia demonstrates Social Media Reading at CES 2011
  4. Kno 14.1 Inch Dual Screen Tablet Computer
  5. The new Spread the Word program from Kobo
  6. Amazon Kindle Publishing for Periodicals beta program for Newspaper and Magazine Publishers

8Jan/110

CompTIA and Leading Manufacturers Extend Program Aimed at Enhancing Printing and Document Imaging Skills among IT …|Lastest Ebook News]

CompTIA and Leading Manufacturers Extend Program Aimed at Enhancing Printing and Document Imaging Skills among IT ...
DOWNERS GROVE, Ill.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Top technology manufacturers team with CompTIA to help IT professionals build skills in printing and document imaging technology solutions.
Read more on Business Wire

31Dec/100

All the details on Amazon’s book lending program – a “how to”

klending.jpg

On time too — year end.
This started as a preview of the new Kindle-book lending feature as described by Amazon.

I tweeted this development, at about 3:45 PM PST after reading about it on the forums where it was already a busy message thread.

That main Kindle Team Forum Announcement is at the Amazon Kindle Community forums, and I’m adding a bit more in this update with modifications to the earlier afternoon report .

REMINDER: If your web browser (especially Firefox) drops you onto the Amazon Kindle Forum’s list of topics instead of bringing you directly to a forum thread, click on Refresh or Reload to get the message thread itself — or click again on the link here.  I don’t know why a ‘retry’ is often needed with the forums, but it is, in my case at least.

Here’s the very brief announcement for the blog record:

‘                                                   Initial post: Dec. 30, 2010 9:16 AM PST
The Amazon Kindle team says:
(AMAZON OFFICIAL)

Today, we’re pleased to launch Kindle Book Lending, a new feature that lets you loan Kindle books to anyone you choose.  The borrower does not need to own a Kindle.  Kindle books can be read on Kindle or using our free Kindle reading applications for PC, Mac, iPad, iPhone, BlackBerry, and Android devices.  Each eligible book can be lent once for a period of 14 days.  Not all e-books are lendable - the publisher or rights holder determines which titles are enabled for lending.  For more information on how to loan Kindle books, please visit www.amazon.com/kindle-lending.

As it is, there is quite a bit of good detail, with illustrations, at the main Kindle-book lending page.

Kindle-edition subscribers: Do use the computer instead to see that very helpful, detailed Amazon how-to-page for loaning or borrowing Kindle books.
Type in http://amzn.to/kindle_lending to see it on the computer.  There are too many illustrations there in larger size to load quickly and read comfortably on a small 6″ e-reader screen.  I’ll use some smaller ones below.

PUBLISHER LIMITATIONS PLACED ON THE LENDING PROGRAM
It works only for books that are approved for lending by them and, as with the B&N Nook’s lending program, the features are quite restricted in that you can lend ANY book JUST ONCE and never again.

As in the physical world, understandably, your lent book can’t be read while it’s ‘out’ with someone else.  The borrower gets it for 14 days MAXIMUM and it then disappears from the borrower’s Kindle (UK: K3) or from their free Kindle apps and cannot be re-borrowed.  There’s no stay of execution on that 14-day loan, so let them know that 14 days is tops.

After the loan is completed, that book is no longer lendable by you to anyone.

SHARING BOOKS RATHER THAN LENDING THEM
But also remember that you can “share” (not loan) Kindle books with others who share one Amazon account (the account owner pays for everything), which is NOT part of the lending program but a very reasonable feature.

LOAN-TRADE SITES
There are already sites being set up so that people can request and trade a loan if the Kindle owner doesn’t need to loan a particular book to someone close and wants a particular book.  A Nook-book loan-trading forum has been popular for awhile.   I imagine the publishers don’t love this idea, but with paper books that often now cost LESS than the e-book versions due to publisher-pricing whimsies, those paper-bound books CAN be lent to one and all, and the paper industry has survived through the decades.

Now that more than one loan-trade site is being set up and I don’t want to recommend (rather than report on) this, I’ve started you off if you want to investigate whether this would work for you and is fair to publishers (only one loan permitted per book would seem to take care of that problem though).
The sites are being announced on Amazon’s own forums and you can find them if you search on “lend book sites” in the forum searchboxes there, on the right.

I do feel strongly that reasonable lending rights should be given for the considerably higher prices placed lately under the Apple iBook Store Agencymodel insisted upon by the Big 5 for unlendable books we can’t resell or give away to friends.  Let’s hope they realize that one loan per book to anyone is not going to make a difference in a world where people have always shared books without being made to feel guilty about it (what are we coming to?), and the margins on e-books are better than they are with paper books.

MAYBE NOT ALL THE BOOKS ARE CATEGORIZED YET
Word is that less than 30% of books are currently categorized as loanable by larger publishers.  In the meantime, when I learned about implementation of book-lending earlier today, I didn’t blog it right away, as Amazon seemed in the middle of implementing it all — any available loanable book descriptions had not shown up (that I could see) in my ManageYourKindle page’s books area yet, nor did any books I own and checked show any loaning-info on the Amazon product pages I was exploring.  Maybe more will show as lendable tomorrow.

ILLUSTRATIONS OF SOME OF THE KINDLE-BOOK LENDING PROCESS
Here’s an image of what you’d see on your ManageYourKindle page when you click on the “+” sign next to one of your books.

My current understanding is that when the publisher has not yet approved the book for loaning, no loan wording appears at all.

At the right is an image of what you’d see at the top of a Kindle book’s Amazon product page if you own that Kindle book.

Even with Kindle books you don’t own, any loan availability should be shown in the Product Details area further down the product page on the left side.  That’ll look similar to the image on the image below.


Does Amazon need to get explicit authorization for the lending program from all publishers?

That could explain the many books I have that show no lendability information on theManageYourKindle page, where we can see loan-availability if we EXPAND the ‘+’ symbol on our books to see if they’re listed as lendable.

OTHER DETAILS FROM AMAZON’S HELP PAGES
Acceptance of loan
Loan recipients will be notified of the loan through the e-mail address that lenders provide and have seven days to accept the loan.  If not accepted after seven days, the book becomes available again in the lender’s Archived Items, at which point the book owner can attempt to loan the book again.

The loan can’t be accepted if the borrower already owns the title or that title is not available in the borrower’s country due to copyright restrictions.  After the seven-day period, the lender will be able to read and loan the book again.

Notifications
Three days before the end of the 14-day loan period, borrowers will receive a courtesy reminder-email about the loan expiration.
Both the book lender and the borrower will receive email notifications when the loan period has ended, and the lender can then access the book again through the device’s Archived Items grouping and the ManageYourKindle page at Amazon.

The borrower will receive a notice on the Home screen of the Kindle-compatible device, indicating that the loan has ended and will still be able to view the title from the Archived Items folder as well [how weird], but selecting the title will bring up a reminder that the loan has ended and provide a link to purchase the item (ahah! that explains it — this way they can be motivated to buy it.).

Early return of a borrowed book
It’s often asked if that will be possible.  The recipient CAN return the loaned book early by accessing the Your Orders section of the Manage Your Kindle, clicking on the “+” symbol by the loaned title, clicking to delete the Title and then clicking ‘Yes’ to confirm the return.

Checking the status of the loan
Again, use the Manage Your Kindle page.  Click on the “+” symbol next to any title to view more details for any book that you’ve loaned or borrowed, including how much time might be left.

Is lending available internationally? In Amazon’s words:
“At this time, Kindle book lending can only be initiated by customers residing in the United States.  If a loan is initiated to a customer outside the United States, the borrower may not be able to accept the loan if the title is not available in their country due to publisher geographical rights.

In these cases the borrower will be notified of this during the Loan redemption process, and the book reading and lending rights will return to the lender at the end of seven days from loan initiation. You can always check the status of a loan by viewing the book on the Manage Your Kindle page.”
_______

In the end, although the forumners were restless about this, Amazon did meet its year-end goal, and the restrictions are not theirs, although forum threads indicate that many don’t know this.

Again, most I’ve read seem to feel that it’s better to have loaned and lost (further loan-rights on a book) than never to have loaned at all.   :-)

Via Andrys Basten’s A Kindle World blog

30Dec/100

Amazon begins its KINDLE-BOOK LENDING program, finally, but on time

AMAZON ACTUALLY STARTS KINDLE-BOOK LENDING PROGRAM.

On time too -- year end.
I need to go out for awhile, but here's a preview of the new Kindle-book lending feature as described by Amazon.  I announced it via Twitter, at about 3:45 PM PST after reading about it on the forums where it is already a busy message thread.

  That main Kindle Team Forum Announcement is at the Amazon Kindle Community forums, and I'll add an update later tonight with much more detail.

  REMINDER: If your web browser (especially Firefox) drops you onto the Amazon forum list of topics instead of bringing you to the forum thread, click on Refresh or Reload to get the message thread itself -- or click again on the link here.  I don't know why a 'retry' is often needed, but it is.

  As it is, there is quite a bit of good detail, with illustrations, at the main Kindle-book lending page.

This long-awaited feature is quite limited by the publishers in that it works only for books approved for lending by them and the features are the same as given for the B&N Nook -- quite restricted in that you can lend ANY book JUST ONCE and never again.  As in the physical world, understandably, your lent book can't be read while it's lent to someone else.  The borrower gets it for 14 days MAXIMUM and it disappears from their Kindle  (UK: K3) or from their free Kindle apps and cannot be re-borrowed.  There's no stay of execution on that 14-day loan.  And then the book is no longer lendable.
  Also remember that you can "share" (not loan) Kindle books with others who share one Amazon account (and account owner pays), which is NOT part of the lending program but a very reasonable feature.

 This much-awaited feature is better than no lending at all, and there is a forum already set up so that people can request and trade a loan if the Kindle owner doesn't need to loan a particular book to someone else and wants a particular book.  The Nook-book trading forum is popular and is run by the same folks, and I suppose the publishers don't like this idea, but with paper books that often now cost LESS than an e-book! due to publisher pricing whimsies, even those paper-bound books can be lent to anyone and the paper industry has survived through the decades.  I'll get the name of the place later.

Word is that only about 30% of books are categorized as lendable by the larger publishers.  In the meantime, I learned about it earlier but did not announce it even on Twitter as they are in the middle of implementing it, and most of this had not shown up in my Kindle management page yet nor on the product pages I was exploring.

MORE LATER! Amazon met its year-end goal, at least, and the restrictions are not theirs.  Again, most I've read seem to feel that it's better to have loaned and lost (further loan-rights on a book) than never to have loaned at all.   :-)

Kindle 3's   (UK: Kindle 3's),   DX Graphite


Check often: Temporarily-free late-listed non-classics or recently published ones
  Guide to finding Free Kindle books and Sources.  Top 100 free bestsellers.
UK-Only: recently published non-classics, bestsellers, or highest-rated ones
    Also, UK customers should see the UK store's Top 100 free bestsellers.

21Dec/100

UK literacy program Booktrust to lose government funding in April, 2011

In 2008, we reported on a UK program called Bookstart, through which United Kingdom residents could send text messages to get free storybooks for their children. David Rothman compared the program to the American program Reading Is Fundamental, which was imperiled by budget cutbacks.

It has been no secret that funding for libraries and similar programs has been under siege in the UK as well as the US during the last year or so, and just now Neil Gaiman retweeted this unpleasant news from the website of Booktrust, the foundation behind Bookstart:

Booktrust had notification on Friday 17 December from the Department for Education that funding for all our English bookgifting programmes (Bookstart, Booktime and Booked Up) will be cut by 100% from 1 April 2011. Please note that this news applies to England only.

We are immensely surprised and disappointed by this decision and know that families, teachers, librarians, health visitors, our publishing partners and many others up and down the country will be sharing these feelings. We passionately believe in these programmes and the proven extraordinary transformative power of reading for pleasure.  We will be consulting with our partners and exploring alternative funding opportunities to do our utmost to make sure that every child continues to be given the opportunity to develop a lifelong love of books.

It is really disappointing to see the forces of literacy take another hit from the slings and arrows of the poor economy. Hopefully the organization can find other ways of continuing its mission.

27Nov/100

Kindle Freebies: How To Find Free Ebooks On Amazon And Create Your Own Lifelong Reading Program


Kindle Freebies: How To Find Free Ebooks On Amazon And Create Your Own Lifelong Reading Program
Everybody loves free stuff, and the new Amazon Kindle delivers freebies to you within 60 seconds, so hold onto your latte, because you’re in for a ride.

The best way to discover the joy of reading is to begin your quest with books that have
Price:BUY IT NOW

Click read more to see Reviews.