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20Apr/110

Learn to Brush Paint Model Airplanes

Learn to Brush Paint Model Airplanes

Learn to Brush Paint Model Airplanes
by Andy M

A guide to getting a great model airplane paint job with a brush. Remember that you will spend hours (maybe tens of hours, or in some cases hundreds of hours!) getting your model airplane to the stage where it is ready for painting. You will more than likely invest additional hours in painting several layers before the model is done. One mistake due to lack of preparation or not recognizing a potential problem could leave you frustrated.Why settle for a poor paint job, or risk having to spend more time taking paint off your model…? We’ve already made just about every mistake possible with an paintbrush, so let our experience be your guide!

Click on the link below to start downloading this free ebook:-
Learn to Brush Paint Model Airplanes – 19 pages, 656KB (PDF)


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12Apr/110

Colorado judge unimpressed by business model of copyright troll Righthaven

Ah, the warm and fuzzy feelings of schadenfreude that come from watching copyright troll Righthaven dig itself in deeper. Righthaven, for those who haven’t been following, is a company whose business model is to look for people quoting or reposting articles from newspapers on-line and then buy the copyright to those articles from the newspapers and file a lawsuit. They’ve filed over 250 lawsuits so far, and reportedly settled with dozens of defendants to the tune of about 0,000.


Earlier today, I noticed an article in Ars Technica (one of whose reporters was actually briefly a target of an inane Righthaven lawsuit, before its lawyers came to their senses—and as a result, now Ars makes sure to repost the photo that got the reporter sued in every article they feature about Righthaven) about one of the company’s cases in Colorado—a suit against a young man suffering from autism, ADD, and diabetes. Righthaven had asked for a three-week extension, undoubtedly hoping to have additional time to try to force Hill to settle—but U.S. District Judge John Kane was having none of it, denying the request and making some decidedly caustic remarks about Righthaven’s behavior.

"Whether or not this case settles is not my primary concern," wrote the judge last week. "Although Plaintiff’s business model relies in large part upon reaching settlement agreements with a minimal investment of time and effort, the purpose of the courts is to provide a forum for the orderly, just, and timely resolution of controversies and disputes. Plaintiff’s wishes to the contrary, the courts are not merely tools for encouraging and exacting settlements from Defendants cowed by the potential costs of litigation and liability."

Subsequently, Righthaven dismissed the case, but not without some passive-aggressive “sour grapes” posing, complaining about “the Defendant and his counsel seek[ing] to extend this action for publicity purposes.” (Wait a second, wasn’t it Righthaven who was just asking for a three-week extension?) And they note that other defendants shouldn’t assume that just because they dropped this case, Righthaven will go easy on anyone else:

"While the Defendant may believe the Notice of Dismissal evidences his authorization to misappropriate copyright protected material in the course of his Internet-related conduct, he can continue to do so at his own peril," wrote Righthaven attorneys. "Others observing these proceedings should so likewise heed this advice because this Notice of Dismissal in no way exonerates any other defendant in any other Righthaven action for stealing copyright protected material and republishing such material without consent."

But it only gets better from there. As PaidContent notes, Judge Kane was so unimpressed that he actually ordered Righthaven’s complaints and warnings stricken from the record as “immaterial and impertinent.”

But the icing on the cake is that Judge Kane will be hearing all 58 lawsuits Righthaven has filed in Colorado—approximately 20% of the 250+ cases it has filed so far. And it sounds like he’s already used up all his patience with Righthaven on just this one.

So far, of the cases that actually made it to trial, Righthaven has lost two and dismissed two (this one and the one against the Ars Technica reporter). It will be fun to see what happens to the others. I feel like making popcorn.

7Apr/110

The Public Broadcasting model for ebooks, by Eric Hellman

mewithnewglasses.jpg

Imagine if Radiolab (my favorite radio show) were a book. It would be a best-seller, probably the kind you might buy at Target. It would sound good on your coffee table, and you’d have a shelf full of your favorite episodes. You’d also be able to get it for free at the library. Now that radio is becoming digital, you might even be able to buy it instantly at Amazon.com, or download it to your iPad from the iBookStore.

It’s expensive to create fantastic programs like Radiolab. New York Public Radio, which produces Radiolab, produces other award winning programs and operates three of America top public radio stations, all on an annual budget of  just under 48 million dollars. That works out to 0,854 per day. If you spread that expense over the 19 million potential listeners in the New Yourk Metropolitan area, it works out to 0.69 pennies per day per person.

But it doesn’t even cost that much to listen to WNYC or WQXR. Most people pay even less, zero pennies, to be exact. What’s more, you can listen to the shows for free on the internet. On your iPad, even. And you don’t even have to go to the library.

A relatively small number of us send money to become “members” of the station. The 0 my family contributed turned into a deduction on the tax return I completed yesterday. Most people who listen don’t contribute, but they’re never referred to as “pirates” or “thieves”.

The reason this works anyway is that radio has large fixed costs and infinitesimal marginal costs. If the listenership doubles, the costs stay exactly the same. It’s not like book publishing, which spends a lot of money pumping paper through a complex supply chain.


A book can cost a lot to produce, too. An author might devote a whole year to the writing of a book. Let’s be generous and say the author deserves 0,000. There’s an editor, a graphic designer, maybe an illustrator who also work on the book. Add some management overhead, tax accountants, lawyers, and it’s easy to get over 0,000 in fixed costs, and we haven’t even started promoting, printing and shipping the book. Many books, of course are produced for much less money. Some authors don’t get paid a cent.

But EBOOKS ARE NOT BOOKS. They’re just bits, and typically not so many, compared to a radio show. The cost of making a copy is negligible. It needn’t cost anything to distribute the ebook. eBook distribution is even cheaper than radio, because you don’t have to pay for transmitter power, and you don’t have to own a frequency license. It’s the monetization machinery that costs money: the ecommerce systems and the DRM. If the producers of ebooks had some way of covering their fixed costs (with profit to make it worth their while), ebooks could work just like free radio. Three million people contributing a dime would do quite nicely. 30,000 contributing would work, too.

A public “bookcasting” system would work somewhat differently from public radio. Audiences and patrons would be assembled around individual books and authors, which would be much more numerous than radio stations. People would be motivated to help make the books they love public by the virtuous cycle of receiving books supported by other public book patrons.

In case you haven’t been paying attention, this business model is what I’ve begun working on as Gluejar, Inc..  The Internet presents an incredible capability for assembling audiences around a common purpose. The business will bring together people to pay for the fixed costs of producing ebooks, reward the best producers with profits, and to make these ebooks public, free to read, free to copy, to everyone, everywhere in the world, using Creative Commons Licensing.

This can work. I can see it now. The pledge drive will take up pages 40-50.

Via Eric Hellman’s Go to Hellman blog

7Apr/110

The Public Broadcasting model for ebooks, by Eric Hellman

mewithnewglasses.jpg

Imagine if Radiolab (my favorite radio show) were a book. It would be a best-seller, probably the kind you might buy at Target. It would sound good on your coffee table, and you’d have a shelf full of your favorite episodes. You’d also be able to get it for free at the library. Now that radio is becoming digital, you might even be able to buy it instantly at Amazon.com, or download it to your iPad from the iBookStore.

It’s expensive to create fantastic programs like Radiolab. New York Public Radio, which produces Radiolab, produces other award winning programs and operates three of America top public radio stations, all on an annual budget of  just under 48 million dollars. That works out to 0,854 per day. If you spread that expense over the 19 million potential listeners in the New Yourk Metropolitan area, it works out to 0.69 pennies per day per person.

But it doesn’t even cost that much to listen to WNYC or WQXR. Most people pay even less, zero pennies, to be exact. What’s more, you can listen to the shows for free on the internet. On your iPad, even. And you don’t even have to go to the library.

A relatively small number of us send money to become “members” of the station. The 0 my family contributed turned into a deduction on the tax return I completed yesterday. Most people who listen don’t contribute, but they’re never referred to as “pirates” or “thieves”.

The reason this works anyway is that radio has large fixed costs and infinitesimal marginal costs. If the listenership doubles, the costs stay exactly the same. It’s not like book publishing, which spends a lot of money pumping paper through a complex supply chain.

A book can cost a lot to produce, too. An author might devote a whole year to the writing of a book. Let’s be generous and say the author deserves 0,000. There’s an editor, a graphic designer, maybe an illustrator who also work on the book. Add some management overhead, tax accountants, lawyers, and it’s easy to get over 0,000 in fixed costs, and we haven’t even started promoting, printing and shipping the book. Many books, of course are produced for much less money. Some authors don’t get paid a cent.

But EBOOKS ARE NOT BOOKS. They’re just bits, and typically not so many, compared to a radio show. The cost of making a copy is negligible. It needn’t cost anything to distribute the ebook. eBook distribution is even cheaper than radio, because you don’t have to pay for transmitter power, and you don’t have to own a frequency license. It’s the monetization machinery that costs money: the ecommerce systems and the DRM. If the producers of ebooks had some way of covering their fixed costs (with profit to make it worth their while), ebooks could work just like free radio. Three million people contributing a dime would do quite nicely. 30,000 contributing would work, too.

A public “bookcasting” system would work somewhat differently from public radio. Audiences and patrons would be assembled around individual books and authors, which would be much more numerous than radio stations. People would be motivated to help make the books they love public by the virtuous cycle of receiving books supported by other public book patrons.

In case you haven’t been paying attention, this business model is what I’ve begun working on as Gluejar, Inc..  The Internet presents an incredible capability for assembling audiences around a common purpose. The business will bring together people to pay for the fixed costs of producing ebooks, reward the best producers with profits, and to make these ebooks public, free to read, free to copy, to everyone, everywhere in the world, using Creative Commons Licensing.

This can work. I can see it now. The pledge drive will take up pages 40-50.

Via Eric Hellman’s Go to Hellman blog

25Mar/1125

Amazon Kindle 3 Unboxing & Review – 2010 WiFi Model


Kindle ebook:Amazon Kindle 3 Unboxing & Review - 2010 WiFi Model
The Amazon Kindle, 2010 WiFi Model, a surprise purchase to see if it really offers up a better book reading experience than the Apple iPad. Check out the video to hear my opinion. Useful Links Supplied by: www.amazon.co.uk Sponsor: www.crucial.com YouTube Channel: www.youtube.com Website: www.geekanoids.co.uk Twitter: www.twitter.com

8Mar/110

Time to change nursing home model, geriatrician tells Utah professionals|Lastest Kindle News]

Time to change nursing home model, geriatrician tells Utah professionals
Time to change nursing home model, geriatrician tells Utah professionals By patty henetz The Salt Lake Tribune Published Mar 3, 2011 05:53PM MDT With their roots in Dickensian workhouses and modeled on hospitals, nursing homes in many ways have earned the dread of old people, especially those who can still remember the stigma of America’s poorhouses and county homes. “The terror people feel is ...
Read more on The Salt Lake Tribune

2Mar/110

Randon House UK will not join the agency model

ImagesAnother one from The Bookseller. Random House UK is not jumping on the agency bandwagon, or at least not yet.

However, Random House UK said it had a wait and see policy on the pricing model. When the Office of Fair Trading launched its investigation into e-book pricing in February, publishers outside agency said they would be more cautious about it while it was under review.

A spokesperson for Random House UK did not refer to the OFT investigation but said: “New commercial models in the fast changing e-book environment are constantly under review. Across our territories—not least in the UK—we continue to evaluate our options and talk to all e-tailers as it is our mission to ensure that our authors’ books are available on all platforms to all potential customers.”

1Mar/110

The last holdout to the agency model is no more: Random adopts the Apple pricing model

Everyone who wondered how long Random House would be the lone major publisher to hold out against the agency pricing model championed by Apple now have their answer: about a year.

As Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg reports in a Wall Street Journal story, the nation’s biggest publisher announced late yesterday that it would be switching to agency pricing for its ebooks today, although the announcement — coming two days before Apple is expected to announce an updated version of the iPad — did not say whether that meant Random House books would now be available in the iBookstore.

As Trachtenberg explains, “The agency model calls for publishers to set the retail prices of their digital titles, with the retailer taking 30% of the sale and the publisher receiving the remainder. Agency pricing effectively eliminates discounting and assures retailers of a profit on each digital book they sell.” That’s mostly true, although Apple’s version of the agency model gives it plenty of control over the pricing supposedly set by publishers, which is one reason Apple’s pricing policies are under investigation by at least a couple of states’ attorneys general.

In any event, the history of Random’s decision, as the WSJ report details, is that …

Five of the country’s six largest publishers switched to agency pricing last year when Apple introduced its iPad tablet. Publishers believed the iPad would sharply expand sales of e-books and challenge Amazon.com Inc.’s popular Kindle e-reader….

Random House, the nation’s largest publisher of consumer books, had declined to change its digital strategy, sticking with traditional wholesale pricing. As a result, its digital titles haven’t been available for sale directly from Apple’s iBookstore, but are available for purchase from various retail bookstore apps on the iPad.

Of course, Random House books won’t be available to read on the iPad if Apple is allowed to go through with its plan to prevent people reading books purchased anywhere other than the iBookstore on Apple devices (another Apple policy that’s under widespread investigation). Which may be one inspiration for the timing of Random’s turn-around.

But as to the company’s stated reasons, according to a report in Publishers Weekly, a Random House statement explained:

The agency model guarantees a higher margin for retailers than did our previous sales terms. We are making this change both as an investment in the successful digital transition of our existing partners and in order to give us the opportunity to forge new retail relationships. We are looking forward to continuing to work with all our retail partners—both digital and physical—on our joint mission to connect our authors with as many readers as possible, in whatever format they prefer.

Whatever the reason, one thing seems certain: As Hillel Italie says in an Associated Press wire story, “Stieg Larsson‘s novels may finally be headed to the iBookstore.”

28Feb/110

Random House joins the Agency Model crowd

ImagesHere is the press release I received:

“Random House, Inc. is adopting the agency model for e-book sales in the United States effective March 1, 2011. Going forward, Random House will set consumer prices for the e-books we publish, and we will provide retailers with a commission for each sale. There are no changes to our terms of sale for physical books.

“The agency model guarantees a higher margin for retailers than did our previous sales terms. We are making this change both as an investment in the successful digital transition of our existing partners and in order to give us the opportunity to forge new retail relationships.

“We are looking forward to continuing to work with all our retail partners – both digital and physical — on our joint mission to connect our authors with as many readers as possible, in whatever format they prefer.”

27Feb/110

Next model of iPad will not be delayed: source|Lastest Ipad News]

Next model of iPad will not be delayed: source
A report that the next version of Apple Inc's iPad tablet computer will be delayed is not true, according to a source familiar with the matter.
Read more on Reuters via Yahoo! News

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