Ebooks on Crack Get your ebook fix.

5Apr/110

Might e-readers replace vanishing libraries?

The UK’s Prospect Magazine has a piece by Leo Benedictus looking at the besieged state of libraries in the UK (with over 450 library closures planned), and wondering whether this is as terrible a thing as library supporters contend given how well e-book readers work.

Benedictus suggests that some defenders of libraries might be doing so less out of a belief in libraries’ intrinsic beneficence than a moral obligation to defend endangered species, and many of the benefits of libraries can be found in e-book readers.

The talk of a future in which children cannot access books is also not just wrong, but backwards. E-readers—already available for £52, and falling—offer an incomparably more convenient way for anyone to find good things. While defending libraries, surely there is also time to promote the fact that, thanks to Project Gutenberg and Google Books, every child in the country can now download virtually any out-of-copyright book for nothing. (Piracy will doubtless do the same for most in-copyright books too, as may digital lending, though this is less cause for celebration.)


I know that my Dad—a former librarian himself—was astounded by just how many books are available via Project Gutenberg, and I have little doubt he will get more than the worth of the he spent on the Kobo out of reading books from that vast repository.

I’m a little hesitant to suggest that e-books can replace vanished libraries, but part of that might just be my respect for a long-lived existing institution talking. I know that I’ve gotten to the point where I view paper books as unwanted shackles to a reading experience I would rather have on a portable device or a computer screen, and I’m a lot more likely to let a library book I’ve requested and checked out sit around for weeks unread than I am to take the time to read it.

Sites like Project Gutenberg help to replace the “classics” section of a library, but the new-titles section is a bit harder. As Benedictus notes, peer-to-peer can make up for it, but only to people who are willing to undertake the risks and complications associated with using it, and to the detriment of writers.

Perhaps some kind of digital lending library could be created after the Overdrive model, that would lend books to people regardless of geographical location, but I have a hard time seeing publishers going for that—especially if the “26 lends per purchase” model adopted by HarperCollins gains traction with other publishers.

5Apr/110

Might e-readers replace vanishing libraries?

The UK’s Prospect Magazine has a piece by Leo Benedictus looking at the besieged state of libraries in the UK (with over 450 library closures planned), and wondering whether this is as terrible a thing as library supporters contend given how well e-book readers work.

Benedictus suggests that some defenders of libraries might be doing so less out of a belief in libraries’ intrinsic beneficence than a moral obligation to defend endangered species, and many of the benefits of libraries can be found in e-book readers.

The talk of a future in which children cannot access books is also not just wrong, but backwards. E-readers—already available for £52, and falling—offer an incomparably more convenient way for anyone to find good things. While defending libraries, surely there is also time to promote the fact that, thanks to Project Gutenberg and Google Books, every child in the country can now download virtually any out-of-copyright book for nothing. (Piracy will doubtless do the same for most in-copyright books too, as may digital lending, though this is less cause for celebration.)


I know that my Dad—a former librarian himself—was astounded by just how many books are available via Project Gutenberg, and I have little doubt he will get more than the worth of the he spent on the Kobo out of reading books from that vast repository.

I’m a little hesitant to suggest that e-books can replace vanished libraries, but part of that might just be my respect for a long-lived existing institution talking. I know that I’ve gotten to the point where I view paper books as unwanted shackles to a reading experience I would rather have on a portable device or a computer screen, and I’m a lot more likely to let a library book I’ve requested and checked out sit around for weeks unread than I am to take the time to read it.

Sites like Project Gutenberg help to replace the “classics” section of a library, but the new-titles section is a bit harder. As Benedictus notes, peer-to-peer can make up for it, but only to people who are willing to undertake the risks and complications associated with using it, and to the detriment of writers.

Perhaps some kind of digital lending library could be created after the Overdrive model, that would lend books to people regardless of geographical location, but I have a hard time seeing publishers going for that—especially if the “26 lends per purchase” model adopted by HarperCollins gains traction with other publishers.

6Mar/110

Apple: App Subscription policies MIGHT not affect Amazon’s ebook app

BUSINESS INSIDER REPORTS AN APPLE QUOTE ON NEW APP POLICY ENFORCEMENTS

 That image at the left is by Asa Mathat, All Things Digital, and is the photo used at the Business Insider article, although the image is much larger there.  It's in candid-portrait style, which tends to focus on expressiveness, taken from the ATD conference last year and startling for the force felt from that face.

I dropped by the The Kindle Chronicles Friday Podcast site to see what Len Edgerly had for this week, as all recent weekly podcasts are available there for listening.  In addition to the podcast that includes news, Kindle tips, reader-comments, and the main interview of the week, Len has a text summary of each podcast's info with links to specific news and tips mentioned in the podcast.

  While there, I saw that Len has highlighted an important Business Insider article by Jay Yarrow that I'd missed, written February 28.  It's of special interest to me because on February 24, I'd written a blog article titled, Why Kindle books will be readable & sync'd on Apple devices no matter what, in which I mentioned the known Kindle-for-Web "solution" (but one must be On the Net to read the book), and I repeated the caution that all actual Apple statements re the 70/30% revenue split had referred to Subscription apps, and not one-off e-book reader apps yet.

  Amazon does have subscriptions offered in a Kindle app but not for Apple devices, only for Android.  Obviously they've never made a doable deal with Apple for an app involving subscriptions.

  The February 1st quote from Apple media representative Trudy Muller about the rejection of the Sony e-reader app was in connection with Sony having an e-book purchasing-option inside their app, to buy a book from Sony of course, using a transaction outside that app while not offering iDevice customers the option of buying that book within the app (from Apple) instead.


  Obviously, Amazon and other booksellers would also need to comply with any such new enforcement of such a rule, before the July 1 deadline for legacy apps to comply.  That's been a point of real concern, but taking over has been the certainty expressed in many columns that this involved Apple taking 30% of the sales transaction (100% of the competitor bookseller's profit).

  However, it's not clear what type of buying-option had been included in Sony's app, rejected by Apple.  Sony hasn't clarified that either.  Most of all there has been no mention (yet) of a 70/30% split in statements about the one-off ebook-reader app.  You'd think Sony would have commented on or complained about that specifically.

  Applying the 70/30% subscription-revenue rule to e-book one-time purchases would mean Apple was bent on grabbing 100% of the bookseller's 30% share of a sale.

  If Apple did do this, that would imply they actually want all online bookseller apps Off their devices (this is certainly possible now that they have Random House in their iBook Store finally), and no sane bookseller would bring their book-sales app to Apple then, since it would be like 'tribute' paid to overlords.

BUSINESS 101
  Who would put a lemonade stand in a mall just to spend the day selling lemonade so that the mall owner would get 100% of the profits?

WHAT'S BEEN SAID SO FAR, FOR SURE
  But, as I've said often, the only Apple-representative quotes since February, mentioning the now infamous 70/30 revenue split, have been specifically about Subscription apps rather than one-off book sales, at this point -- even if Apple has general rules about revenue-sharing in their November-updated guidelines for Apple-app Developers.

  Since this topic concerns many of us, here is what Business Insider's Yarrow reports about a meeting between Berstein analyst Toni Sacconaghi and Apple execs during that week.
  The article's headline is "Maybe Apple's New App Subscription Rule Won't Hammer Amazon."  Excerpts:

' Apple's new in-app subscription policy might not affect Amazon after all.

Berstein analyst Toni Sacconaghi met with Apple execs last week and pressed them on how the new subscription policy would affect Netflix and Amazon.

Eddy Cue, Apple's Internet services boss, wouldn't comment on either company, but said, the announcement only applied to subscriptions.

Well, Amazon Kindle books aren't subscriptions, so they shouldn't be affected, no?

We've been pressing on Amazon trying to get a comment and the company is just ignoring us.  But, we think there's a chance that it's just not going to be affected by Apple.

Why?  Beyond Cue's comment, we've heard from a source that Netflix would not be affected by Apple's new policy.  We're not sure of the exact reason why, but it now seems reasonable to think it's because Netflix isn't a publishing business.

Don't forget Steve Jobs reportedly said in an email, "We created subscriptions for publishing apps, not SaaS ["software as a service"] apps." (Amazon, for the most part, isn't a publishing company.)

Another reason for Netflix to be exempted: Apple needs Netflix to make Apple TV a success, and keep iPad owners happy... '

Yarrow then speculates on the lack of comment by Apple re Netflix and Amazon and also on the silence from those companies on Apple's recent moves and reminds us that no one knows what will happen on all of this.  I'll repeat that Apple would suffer more from the Kindle app not being available on the iDevices since they WILL be on all the new Android devices and a real pull for consumers trying to decide on tablets in 2011.

But the statement by Apple's Eddy Cue is somewhat encouraging and a sign of sanity.  Signs are only signs though.

Kindle 3's   (UK: Kindle 3's),   DX Graphite


Check often: Temporarily-free late-listed non-classics or recently published ones
  Guide to finding Free Kindle books and Sources.  Top 100 free bestsellers.
UK-Only: recently published non-classics, bestsellers, or highest-rated ones
    Also, UK customers should see the UK store's Top 100 free bestsellers.

4Mar/110

Flexible e-readers and displays made of silk might be a reality soon

It wasn’t too long ago when there used to be a niche segment where we would come across e-readers that exhibited a certain degree of flexibility. Often and on there would be pictures of e-reader bend to some extent which would hold us in awe. Unfortunately, none of them ever turned out to be a market success and it was left to only the conventional and inflexible e-reader to satisfy the e-book loving crowd.

However, it seems such bendable e-readers are back again, thanks to a group of researchers based in Taiwan who claim to have hit upon a novel way of devising electronics that could withstand bending and shearing forces up to some extent. And the most surprising aspect of it all, our good old silk fabric is the center of it all. For it’s all about a technique that comprises of silk in liquid form, which is converted to a membrane that exhibits properties of insulators and can function as flexible thin film transistors.

The method has been devised by an engineering professor along with two post graduate students at Taiwan’s National Tsing Hua University and have stated they are already in discussion with a few manufacturers. Needless to say, the technology holds a lot of promise and could well be the material of the e-readers, LED displays and RFD tags of future.

The use of silk for the manufacture of electronic devices can also lead to a lot of savings cost wise as it is estimated that its just .03 worth of silk that would be required for every device. Then silk being a natural fiber also means the damage done to the environment is also the least. Much less than what plastics usually do.

There is no word though as to when we might get to see a silk e-reader in a real world scenario sharing retail space with perhaps the Kindle and the Nooks of the future.

Related posts:

  1. Innovative Tablet-Size Flexible Electronic Paper Display
  2. Inspiring Technology For E-Readers in 2010
  3. Bridgestone The New Flexible E-reader
  4. E-Readers Cost Might Come Down To Just 0 This Year
  5. Deciding Factors for eBook Readers
  6. ITRI introduces new flexible color AMOLED display
26Feb/110

Top ten pirated e-books on Pirate Bay: Not what you might expect

Galleycat recently took a look at the top ten pirated e-books on Pirate Bay, and found a rather peculiar selection of titles that would seem to indicate the average pirate is primarily interested in math, sex, and Photoshop. (Yeah, sounds like the average geek to me.)

The list includes three sex-related, two math, and two Photoshop titles, The remaining three books have to do with odd trivia, secrets of rich people, and how to make people like you. It’s interesting this top-ten list includes not a single fiction title—they’re all self-help and non-fiction.

Of course, the article notes that bundles of hundreds or thousands of titles are popular, so these are only the most popular titles that are shared by themselves. Even leaving aside those immense bundles, a lot of popular-to-pirate e-books come as part of series and sets (the Harry Potter novels, for instance), so apart from being kind of interesting, the list is largely meaningless.

25Feb/110

Why Borders failed redux, and might it bring independent bookstores back?

The Borders post-mortems continue. Here’s a couple more of them that are particularly worthy of note.

First, on Quora, another Borders ex-exec sets down his thoughts. Mark Evans, former Director of Merchandise Planning & Analysis, has a six-point analysis of why the store failed. Though he goes into detail for each one, his list comes down to the following reasons:

  1. Failure to adequately address the Internet sales channel and the subsequent e-book market.
  2. Poor real estate strategy.
  3. Over-investment in music.
  4. Over-reliance on assortment size to compete as opposed to efficient operations.
  5. Failure to build efficient systems and processes.
  6. Branding failure.

He brings up some interesting points I hadn’t seen mentioned elsewhere—particularly the over-investment in music, and the associated problems the failure of the physical music market caused when those sections disappeared from Borders stores. He also touches on the Internet failure and the inefficient inventory management system brought up by former Borders UK exec Philip Downer.

He doesn’t mention another failure Downer pointed out, which was Borders’s attempt to become a cool place to hang out at the expense of actually selling books. That’s left to TechCrunch’s noted purveyor of sarcasm, Paul Carr:

The company took a big gamble a decade or so ago in focusing on the notion of bricks-and-mortar book shopping as an “experience”. Stores were built with coffee shops and comfy chairs and warm little nooks in which people could hang out all day and read all the book and magazines they wanted. Unfortunately, after finishing their coffee and their free reading time, many of those people subsequently went home and took advantage of Amazon’s significant discounts to actually buy books. Only those few customers who demanded instant gratification needed to actually pay full price in store.

Then, with the arrival of the Kindle, even those impatient shoppers had no need to visit Borders.

They really didn’t do a very good job welcoming people in the Internet age. The few times I stopped into a Borders before this, their wireless Internet was one of very few that still required payment of subscription fees for use. Even when I stopped in at the liquidation sale, I couldn’t hop on with my iPod Touch; clicking on the login page didn’t do anything. Perhaps it requires Flash.

Carr thinks that the disappearance of Borders might lead to a resurgence of independent bookstores in areas lacking Barnes & Nobles (such as San Francisco), which can provide in-person experiences such as authorial readings or signings that Amazon can’t hope to match.

I think he may be a little too optimistic, but find myself hoping he isn’t. But perhaps coupled with Google’s plan to allow indie bookstores to take a cut of the e-book market, it will at least keep them alive a little longer.

On a related note, The Consumerist touches on the fact I mentioned a few days ago: Borders’s going-out-of-business sale is not a good place to find bargains. The piece quotes blog posts by named and anonymous Borders employees about their experiences during the sales. Even locations that are staying open are getting confused customers bleeding over into them and getting angry when things aren’t on sale. (Found via eBookNewser.)

24Jan/110

Back to basics – What is an ereader exactly, and why might you want one?





What is all the fuss about with ereaders?

I felt that perhaps it might be useful to go right back to the basics of the whats and whys of ereaders and ebooks, to try and explore why anyone should buy such a device to read their books with – after all, we have happily read books published on paper for centuries now, with no real problems.

It is absolutely true that paper books are an almost perfectly designed method for reading, but they suffer from a number of drawbacks, and it is these drawbacks that the ereader and its attendant ebooks were designed to respond to.

Drawback number 1:

Paper books are – or can be – heavy and bulky to carry around.

Drawback number 2:

You need to find a book shop to get new books to read.

Drawback number 3:

If you are old or visually impaired paper books can be hard or impossible to read owing to the text being too small.

These are just a few examples of the way that paper books are not actually the ideal method of dealing with your reading needs, there are probably many more if one sat down and really thought about it, but they will do to start with.

Ok, so how do ereaders and ebooks respond to these points?

An ereader is at its simplest, nothing more than a device in which you may store an enormous number of ebooks (ebooks = electronic or digital books), so that instead of having to deal with kilos of paper, you merely have one light and generally comfortably sized device on which to keep an almost unlimited number of books, and with which it is simple and pleasant to read these books with.

An increasing number of ereaders these days are capable  of connecting to various online book shops via the mobile phone network, so you can go and hunt up new ebooks directly from your ereader very easily and rapidly.   Thus you can find and buy ebooks at any moment you choose without moving from your house.

This last benefit of ereaders is truly useful, all ereaders are capable of presenting your ebooks to you in a variety of text sizes, from very small to very large, all at the click of a button, so you can adjust the size of the text you are reading  to suite your needs at all times.  This is a real boon for those whose eye sight is not perfect – which is a vast number of us.

So, those are some of the advantages of ereaders.

Now, what exactly is an ereader?

An ereader is a device consisting of a screen and various buttons with which to carry out the different actions you need in order to read or organise your ebooks. and in which you may store your ebooks.  They come in basically two types, which relate to the type of screen they offer you, and are generally about the size of a paper back novel.  But much thinner.

e-Ink screens:

The first, and generally considered best type of ereaders for simply reading with have one version or another of what is called an e-Ink or e-Paper screen.   Currently these are almost all monochrome, which means black text on a white page.   These are very easy on your eyes, as they are not in fact merely small computer screens, but an electronic version of paper, so they are not in fact illuminated as a computer screen is (called Back Lit).  Thus, as with a paper book, you will need a reading light if you want to read in a dark place, and if you are in bright sunlight, they work perfectly.   In fact they behave exactly the same as a paper book does in this respect.   Thus an ereader with an e-ink screen is to all intents and purposes exactly like a paper book.

LCD or TFT screens:

The other type currently available make use of some version of a computer screen, and are thus capable of reproducing colour, which can be good (magazines, kids books, text books and so on).  But, they suffer from a number of problems.  Firstly they are very hard to see in bright sunlight (try a computer on a beach and you will see what I mean), they are much harder on the eye, and owing to the different technology used, they consume much more power, so you have to recharge its batteries much more often than with an e-ink ereader – every few hours instead of about once every couple of weeks as is the case with e-Ink screens.

What do I see on the screen?

Whichever type of screen technology you get, they both work on the same basic idea, that is they present you with one page at a time on the screen, and when you have read that page, either by means of a button, or sort of a swiping action you move on to the following page (if it has a touch screen – which means that you control your ereader by means of a touch sensitive screen, rather than buttons) .  Just as with a paper book really, except here you only have one page at a time (which in passing I would mention makes bed time reading much easier… get comfortable and you dont have to deal with left hand and right hand pages, if you see what I mean).

As I said above, another benefit of an ereader is the ability to set the text size to a size that works for you.   All ereaders, regardless of whatever type of screen they use have this extremely useful ability.

Also, all ereaders (well, almost all) remember the last page you were reading when you have turned it off, so when you want to carry on reading, you can go directly to the page you were reading, a sort of electronic dog-earing system.

Easy to use?

Yes, is the simple answer to that question.  Ereaders are mostly very well designed to use  – at least the better makes are.  there are an increasing number of cheap Chinese made ones appearing on the market, and these can be tricky to get working, so if you happen to be not very good with computers, you should perhaps avoid these ereaders, and choose one of the established makes (Sony, Kindle, Nook, Kobo and so on).

Assuming you have an ereader that is moderately well designed, you will master it in a very short time, certainly using it simply to store and read ebooks with.

Other functions:

Most ereaders these days come with a whole variety of extra functions, which may or may not be of use to you.  Such as the ability to make notes on pages, using one form or other of keyboard that the device may have, highlight or mark passages that interest you, built in dictionaries to enable you to quickly find the meanings of words in the text you  might not know, and a whole load of other functions.   Obviously when choosing an ereader, you should consider which if any, of these extra functions  are of interest to you,and choose accordingly.

Where do you get your ebooks?

This can be fun, and also very tricky, as the publishing and book selling world is still struggling to find the business model that works both for them and for us, and frankly, it is something of a mess just now.

But, putting that to one side for now, one gets ebooks from a huge variety of online sources.

Not free ebooks – ones you pay for, that is:

Depending on which ereader you have chosen, there are a number of ways in which you may purchase ebooks to read on it.  This is complicated just now, sadly, so I will have to deal with this by make.

Kindle, from Amazon:

If you have chosen a Kindle, then unless you happen to be pretty nifty with computers, you are effectively limited to buying your ebooks from the Amazon website as Amazon (the makers of the Kindle range of ereaders) have chosen to have a format for their ebooks that is unique to them, so you wont be able to read any ebooks you purchase from other sources on your Kindle ereader.  Equally, any ebooks you buy from them wont work on any other ereader.

Against which, Amazon have developed an extremely easy to use system for buying ebooks from them using the mobile phone networks or the wireless internet, and their prices are in line with every other ebook seller, as well as offering you a huge range of ebooks.

And the Kindle 3 is a very good ereader, that is for sure, and competitively priced as well.

Nook ereaders from Barnes and Noble:

The above comments about the Kindle apply equally to the Nook range of ereaders. Be aware that the Nook works with ePub, but it is a different type to the ePub all others use.

All other ereaders – Sony, Kobo and any others you may find:

As far as I know, apart from the Nook and Kindle, almost all other ereaders work with (among other formats) the effective world standard ebook format, known as ePub.   This means that you may buy ebooks from any online ebook seller (apart from Barnes and Noble – see note above) who offer ebooks in the ePub format, which is all of them really.

DRM:

This is another tricky area, DRM, which means Digital Rights Management is a system to prevent you from distributing any copyrighted ebooks you buy to others, and effectively means that such ebooks will only work on your ereader.

All ebooks you buy are likely to be subject to DRM protection.

This isn’t the place to go into the details of how this works, but you have to be aware that you will need DRM software either on your ereader or computer in order to read such ebooks.   This is normally an automatic process that happens when you first use your ereader, otherwise you may well need a bit of help from someone with a reasonable grasp of such technology

Free ebooks:

Now this is where ereaders truly come into their own.  There are now hundreds of websites that offer free ebooks for you to download, almost all in ePub format as well.  To a large degree this  means books that are out of copyright, i.e the author died some time ago, so they tend to be all the well known Classics, but they are by no means limited to these, there are many where authors place their books to be distributed for free.

In the course of writing this blog I have discovered hundreds of such sites, a number of which I have reviewed on the blog, so you can either use the search window (top right here) or simply type “Free ebooks” into Google, and you will be amazed at the choice that you are presented with.

All free ebooks are of course DRM free, so they will work happily on any ereader you might have, and can be given away, copied and transferred from one ereader to another with no hassles.  From our point of view, an ideal arrangement.

Need help?

So, there you have a sort of beginners guide to ereaders, if you have any questions, either send me an email (from the Contact me tab above) or leave it as a comment here, and I shall do my best to help you out.




22Jan/110

Motoblur might be coming to Xoom Tablet PC

There are a number of reasons that make the Xoom tablet PC from Motorola important. For one, it would be the first serious tablet effort from Motorola that till now has enjoyed a commendable presence in the smartphone segment. Then the Xoom tablet carries a lot of significance for Google too as it would be the first tablet PC to run Honeycomb, the first version of Android that has been designed exclusively for use on tablet like devices. Then of course, the competition is just too relentless, which makes it extremely important to be spot on right from day one. Needless to say, the two parties involved are extra cautious to make this a grand success but then, there also has emerged a key area where one might say there does exists some amount of friction.

For instance, it is the UI that perhaps is generating some amount of heat. After all, a product from Motorola devoid of the Motoblur UI is perhaps a bit too much for the Motorola boffins to digest. On the other hand, all Google wants is that the tablet should be released while the Honeycomb is as close to original as it can be. Fortunately, a stalemate already seems to be in place so that the tablet would eventually get to see the light of the day while having the Honeycomb operating system and no Motoblur. However, the latter would get onto the scene sometime later when the Motorola special UI will be made available as an over the air update. This was announced by Motorola executive Jonathan Nattrass though he did not specify if it would be an optional upgrade or compulsory.

In the meantime, there has also been other developments that however has messed things up more than sorting it out. Like there has been a word from Motorola that has spelt out clearly that they have no plans to meddle with the Honeycomb UI and that Motoblur does not fit into the scheme of things.

All we can do is wait for the final thing to emerge to find out which of the two version gains precedence over the other.

via gizmodo

Related posts:

  1. Motorola reveals the Xoom Android 3.0 Tablet PC
  2. Hands on with the Motorola Xoom Tablet PC at CES 2011
  3. Good e-Reader Exclusive – Live Video of the new Motorola Xoom Tablet PC
  4. 1 Million Playbooks and Xoom Tablets to be manufactured in 1st Quarter 2011
  5. Motorola tablet running Honeycomb spotted
  6. Motorola tablet spotted again

28Dec/100

Kindle 3 crashes might be due to your case, not your e-reader|Lastest Kindle News]

Kindle 3 crashes might be due to your case, not your e-reader
Amazon’s Kindle line of e-readers are remarkably solid devices, rarely prone to any sort of spontaneous bugs or hardware failures… a fact largely due to the pedigree of the e-reader’s simple hardware and closed software. That’s why it was surprising when users began to report Kindle 3 crashes left, right and center. Even more [...]
Read more on Geek.com

14Dec/100

HP WebOS Tablet might be out March 2011

Dec

14

By Michael

palm webos

Bank of Montreal Capital Markets analyst Keith Bachman met up with some tech companies lately, most notably Inventec, whom is manufacturing the HP WebOS slate for next year. It seems like this new device which has been known by many names in the development process such as the Palm Pad and the HP Hurricane, might be debuting in March of 2011.

Also CEO of HP Todd Bradley recently mentioned in the Q3 earnings report to shareholders that HP will have a Microsoft based and a WebOS based tablet out in early 2011. It might seem like the Palm acquisition by HP might be worth it after all, instead of just Zeus printers!

Although specs are few and far between at the moment, we hope to check this WebOS tablet out at CES this year.

Related posts:

  1. WebOS based HP tablet to debut in 2011
  2. HP tablet in Q1 2011 is confirmed
  3. Good News for WebOS Developers – Palm Refunding submission fees
  4. HP Hurricane Tablet PC Running WebOS Coming Soon
  5. MSI delays Wintel Tablet PC until March 2011
  6. HP Slate to run Palm WebOS instead of Windows 7?

Categories : Tablet-Slates