Ebooks on Crack Get your ebook fix.

7May/117

Scrivener 2 Basics – Exporting to an eBook


Ipad ebook:Scrivener 2 Basics - Exporting to an eBook
Tutorial video showing how to export an eBook from Scrivener. Includes exporting both an EPUB file and Kindle associated file type. Scrivener's website: www.literatureandlatte.com


7May/110

Chinagram – Amazing Ebook App for iPad – Learn all about Chinese writing





Chinagram, a wonderful interactive ebook for the iPad:

ToDo have recently launched a most intriguing interactive ebook for those who wish to understand and learn how the Chinese write….  All those thousands of rather beautiful but confusing characters.

I have had a look at it, and as one who has struggled to learn how to read and write in Chinese, I found it both useful, to the point, accurate and fun as well.  full of background information about how all the various characters evolved over the roughly 4000 years that the Chinese have been writing, how they should be written (the order and direction of the brush strokes) and so on.

A fascinating and useful ebook for anyone interested in this intriguing language.

In the press release they sent me, they describe what this application actually is rather well, so here is how they describe it:

Chinagram is an iPad application that tells the story of Chinese writing, explaining its logic and showing its beauty, sign after sign.
Chinagram blends the fascinating story and aesthetics of Chinese characters with beautifully crafted graphics and a sleek, intuitive user interface.

Based on the book “Chinese Writing” by Yuan Huaqing, a renowned Chinese language professor and translator, Chinagram is not a dictionary, but an annotated history of Chinese writing that will show you how to see beyond the elegance of the characters to understand their origin and rationale.
Each character is either a beautiful example of calligraphic art and a distillation of China’s history and traditional culture.
Chinagram includes a historical and a linguistic overview, which will help you understand how Chinese writing has changed over the centuries and what are its basic rules today.
With Chinagram you can approach Chinese by discovering the meaning and the evolution of over 120 symbols chosen among the most representative ones. For each symbol you can read an in-depth explanation, including examples of how each word is used today in common idioms and sayings.
You can also listen to its pronunciation and try your hand at tracing your first ideograms right on your iPad’s screen.

When you bear in mind that most educated Chinese may know anything up to 50,000 characters, you begin to understand the complexity of it all – Me, I managed to learn about 100 while living in Beijing, and was pretty pleased with myself for getting that many under my belt, so I am overwhelmed with admiration for all those Chinese kids who learn 50 or so a week.

On the website dedicated to this App, they show you roughly what you will get if you purchase the thing, it is rather beautiful and well worth a visit I think.


 

Chinagram for iPad from todo.to.it on Vimeo.

Chinagram is now available on the App Store at launch price of EUR
2.99 (USD 3.99, GBP 2.39). Full price will be EUR 3.99 (USD 4.99, GBP 3.49).




6May/110

Fraser Speirs on ebook pricing

Fraser Speirs is a software developer (Mac and iPhone) and a teacher.  This is from his blog where you can find further exposition.

Let me make this very clear: I know absolutely nothing about publishing. I don’t know how deals are structured, I don’t know about advances or geographical rights or anything. All I know is that I’m being offered one package of words in, usually, three formats – hardback, paperback and ebook – at three different prices.

In The Design of Everyday Things Donald Norman famously wrote about the disconnect between the user’s mental model of how something works and how it actually works. I think I have this problem with ebooks.

Here’s how I think of it:

 

 


I made these numbers up and I have no idea if the relative proportions of these blocks are correct in any way. In a sense, that’s not the point. What I’m expressing here is how I think about the value proposition when presented with three different ways to read the same book.

The thing that rubs me the wrong way with being asked to pay a premium for an ebook is that, thanks to DRM, a publisher gets to sell a copy that can never ever be resold. I think that enforced reduction to zero of the resale value of a book should be reflected in the purchase price – particularly for higher-end titles such as reference books.

The graph above shows how I think of ebooks and my buying behaviour reflects that. I don’t see ebooks as luxury items. I don’t see how pricing ebooks above hardback prices is defensible when there has been no material to physically construct and ship. I particularly resent that pricing structure when so many ebooks that I purchase have obvious OCR errors or truly awful typography.

6May/110

How To Create A Top Selling eBook In 7 Easy Steps


Free ebooks:How To Create A Top Selling eBook In 7 Easy Steps
www.GideonShalwick.com Inside this cool new video I show you exactly how I create popular ebooks. It's real fun and it's probably a lot easier than you think to create your very own ebook. Gideon Shalwick

5May/110

France faces battle over ebook pricing law

French flag

That’s what The Bookseller is saying this morning:

France is bracing for battle with the European Commission with its parliament on the verge of adopting a bill allowing publishers to fix prices for all e-books sold in France.

The bill, which was approved unanimously by an all-party committee from both houses of parliament on Tuesday, said retailers inside or outside France must respect the fixed prices. Final votes in the Senate tonight (5th May) and the National Assembly on 17th May are seen as formalities. So far, Google and Amazon have said they will comply with the law and Apple is expected to do so too.

The cross-border clause has been the main stumbling block to the bill.

More info in the article.

5May/110

France faces battle over ebook pricing law

French flag

That’s what The Bookseller is saying this morning:

France is bracing for battle with the European Commission with its parliament on the verge of adopting a bill allowing publishers to fix prices for all e-books sold in France.

The bill, which was approved unanimously by an all-party committee from both houses of parliament on Tuesday, said retailers inside or outside France must respect the fixed prices. Final votes in the Senate tonight (5th May) and the National Assembly on 17th May are seen as formalities. So far, Google and Amazon have said they will comply with the law and Apple is expected to do so too.

The cross-border clause has been the main stumbling block to the bill.

More info in the article.

5May/110

National Information Standards Organization launches ebook SIG

Logo

From the NISO News Release:

The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) and its Architecture Committee are pleased to announce the creation of a Special Interest Group focused on E-books (the NISO E-book SIG). Simultaneous with the formation of the group, NISO is issuing a call for participation in the E-book SIG and its associated monitoring group. The E-book SIG will explore a range of industry best practices and standards related to the creation, distribution, discovery, delivery, and preservation of digital book content. The primary responsibilities of the group will be to continuously monitor and review the state of the industry for e-books and to suggest areas for new initiatives within NISO or areas where NISO can engage with other communities on e-book work underway outside of NISO. The group will also host thought leader meetings and commission relevant research to advance the state of the industry.

Read the Complete News Release

4May/110

Delaying e-book sales to save bookstores

On The Bookseller blog, John Blake offers what he apparently believes is a novel solution to “saving” bookstores from the encroaching press of e-books: delay selling the e-book until later. He writes:

The idea of simultaneously publishing an exciting new title both as a hardback and as an e-book seems totally crazy. If only publishers could publish the book as a hardback initially, then put out the e-book some months later, bookshops would be given a sporting chance to stay in business, and the dizzying decline of book sales could almost certainly be slowed.

I was fascinated to discover that serious readers—people who buy more than 12 books a year—are fast becoming the keenest e-book customers. These, surely, are the very people who would wish to purchase hardbacks rather than waiting months for an e-book edition.

I wonder just what rock he’s been living under lately. Delaying (which is to say, “windowing”) the e-book has been tried, but not all “serious readers” are so biddable as to let themselves be pressured into buying the hardback. Many of them will submit one-star reviews on Amazon decrying the publisher’s asinine anti-e-book position and not buy it at all out of spite, and others will go out and pirate the book as soon as some enterprising pirate scanner makes it available—and then not buy the e-book when it is released.

And as I mentioned a couple of weeks ago, there are those who think that the idea of “windowing” hardcovers and paperbacks should itself be stopped, because only making the book available in a more expensive form costs the sales of those who wouldn’t buy that form but would buy a less expensive one then—but lose their enthusiasm by the time that less-expensive version comes onto the market.

There’s no point in taking up arms against a sea of troubles. E-books are rapidly gaining popularity because people find them more convenient than paper books. If you try to force them to go back to the old dead-tree format for the sake of “saving bookstores,” you’re going to cost yourself sales (probably more than enough to offset the hardcover sales you’d gain), and you’re going to look like just the kind of greedy corporate exec whose works people pirate just to piss off.

Perhaps Mr. Blake’s position can be explained by what he says in later paragraphs, citing friends of his who “used to be” crazy about e-books but are now buying printed books again. He seems to believe that most people who buy e-books don’t really want e-books, and would actually just prefer paper books if they only thought about it. What a remarkably patronizing point of view.

4May/110

Quick Note: Lagardère (Hachette) ebook sales up 88% in first quarter

quick note.png

From their press release:

E-book sales momentum was considerable (up 88% compared to Q1 2010), accounting for approximately 22% of revenue in the United States and 5% in the United Kingdom. This development is the result of very brisk sales of e-book readers at the end of the year. …

e-book sales will continue to grow in the United States, albeit at a less upbeat rate than in the first quarter, to reach 15% to 20% of revenues. E-books could account for 5% to 10% of revenues in the United Kingdom in 2011.

4May/110

100 Queensland Stories – PDF ebook in aid of flood victims in Queensland





An interesting collection of Queensland short stories:

As a result of the terrible floods earlier this year, an ebook collection of 100  short stories written by a number of Queensland authors is now available to be downloaded for your reading pleasure.

Note added later:

I have had a comment from the author (Penelope Cottier) of one of the stories in this bundle in which she pointed out to me that all these stories are not in fact written by Queensland writers.

Had a look, and liked what I read:

I have downloaded them and had a bit of a snuffle around the collection, and some of them are remarkably good reading I found to my pleasant surprise.  They cover a huge range of genres, ranging from stories about the floods themselves to pure science fiction, and all points in between.   As an example of the state of Australian short story writing they are very encouraging, the art form is obviously alive and very healthy in Oz just now.

As the CEO of The Queensland Writers Centre, Kate Eltham puts it:

“One hundred beautiful stories. Our stories.
When so much was lost or destroyed, this was created.
That’s something that can never recede or wash away.”

100 STORIES FOR QUEENSLAND has something for everyone, from slice of life to science fiction, fantasy to romance, paranormal to literary fiction. Heart-warming, quirky, inspiring and funny, the stories between these covers will lift readers to higher ground.

I reckon that is a pretty good description of the variety of writing you will find if you purchase this bundle from them.    And not only will you be giving yourself a whole heap of good reading, but also helping the victims of those horrible floods, which caused so much destruction in Queensland.   Sadly they don’t state on their website what percentage of the money will go to the Flood Relief of Queensland, which is a pity, as I would personally find it better if I knew that, say, 40% would go to the relief fund….   So we have to simply trust that they will actually donate to the fund……..  At any event, the stories are good, and that is actually reason enough to buy this bundle.

Free taster:

They have also made it easy for us to decide if we want to buy this bundle by allowing  us to download for free a sort of taster, which gives one a very good idea about the sort of reading they are offering us, I shall place the link to this download below, so you may give it a go.

Blast it…  its in PDF!

Sadly they have published them in PDF format, not the nicest format to use on an ereader, but with programs such as Calibre it is easy enough to convert them to whatever format works best on your ereader, which i would advise you to do at once.

Price:

If you decide to buy this collection of short stories, it will cost you the Princely sum of AUD 4.99, which seems perfectly reasonable to me, and certainly in line with other ebook sites, such as Smashwords et.al.

To buy the bundle: http://100storiesforqueensland.org/?p=191

To download the sampler: http://www.100storiesforqueensland.org/ebook/100STORIESsample.pdf

Share with us:

If you do buy this collection, do get back to us and let us know what you thought of the stories in it.




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