Ebooks on Crack Get your ebook fix.

31Mar/110

Key iOS developer sees iPad tablet competition on the horizon|Lastest Ipad News]

Key iOS developer sees iPad tablet competition on the horizon
Apple created the tablet market, but iOS developer Raven Zachary says the growth opportunity for other companies is huge.
Read more on IT World


27Feb/110

RIM Developer Relations chief responds to disgruntled PlayBook developer

Yesterday I mentioned an open letter from frustrated would-be PlayBook developer Jamie Murai concerning all the problems he encountered trying to register for and use the development tools for the Blackberry PlayBook tablet. He ended up throwing up his hands and giving up in disgust.

Today, Tyler Lessard, the head of RIM’s BlackBerry Developer Relations and Developer Programs team responded on the Inside BlackBerry Developer’s Blog.

Jamie’s posting on Friday raised a number of challenges that he faced while getting started with development for the BlackBerry PlayBook and while registering to become a BlackBerry App World vendor. First off, I’d like to thank Jamie for his candid feedback. Suggestions like his are critical in helping us improve our products and processes. I want you to know that we are absolutely listening.


He goes into detail, mentioning some of Jamie’s concerns point by point and what BlackBerry was doing to address them. It’s fairly impressive that he didn’t even wait until Monday to get the post out, especially considering it presumably had to be run by RIM’s lawyers or publicity department before posting. While much of it is standard corporate-reassurance speak, it does nonetheless provide a sharp contrast to Apple’s overall silence in response to disgruntled developers.

If RIM is able to overcome the problems Murai pointed out and attract more developers to the fold, perhaps it might just have a chance to compete against the iPad after all.

27Feb/110

RIM Developer Relations chief responds to disgruntled PlayBook developer

Yesterday I mentioned an open letter from frustrated would-be PlayBook developer Jamie Murai concerning all the problems he encountered trying to register for and use the development tools for the Blackberry PlayBook tablet. He ended up throwing up his hands and giving up in disgust.


Today, Tyler Lessard, the head of RIM’s BlackBerry Developer Relations and Developer Programs team responded on the Inside BlackBerry Developer’s Blog.

Jamie’s posting on Friday raised a number of challenges that he faced while getting started with development for the BlackBerry PlayBook and while registering to become a BlackBerry App World vendor. First off, I’d like to thank Jamie for his candid feedback. Suggestions like his are critical in helping us improve our products and processes. I want you to know that we are absolutely listening.

He goes into detail, mentioning some of Jamie’s concerns point by point and what BlackBerry was doing to address them. It’s fairly impressive that he didn’t even wait until Monday to get the post out, especially considering it presumably had to be run by RIM’s lawyers or publicity department before posting. While much of it is standard corporate-reassurance speak, it does nonetheless provide a sharp contrast to Apple’s overall silence in response to disgruntled developers.

If RIM is able to overcome the problems Murai pointed out and attract more developers to the fold, perhaps it might just have a chance to compete against the iPad after all.

21Feb/110

Ex-Kobo developer: Apple in-app purchase system will not support Kobo-sized catalogs

Jim Dovey, formerly the Apple Platforms Team Lead for Kobo has posted a follow-up to his earlier post on the Apple subscription fee matter. (He wasn’t “former” when he posted the previous one, and subsequently had to take it down, though in a comment he cites Canada Immigration as the reason for his current ex-employment.) This time Dovey is careful to point out he doesn’t speak for Kobo, and lays out the process that led to the current state of things.

Vendors like Amazon, B&N, and Kobo, Dovey points out, spent millions of dollars developing their content-distribution systems, and operate on very tight margins. When Apple originally required vendors to fork over 30% of in-app purchase fees and the bookstores told them this was not feasible, Apple told them to redirect outside the app to sell content.

Then Apple decided to compete directly with these vendors, using private Apple-only APIs that competitors can’t—and that all apps that have anything to do with selling content must sell it in-app and give them 30%. This amounts to their entire revenue stream.

And he brings up another point I hadn’t seen mentioned elsewhere: Apple’s in-app purchasing system only allows an extremely limited number of purchasable items to be listed in an app’s catalog—3,000 or 5,000, depending on who you talk to. And bookstores like Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Kobo have literally millions of titles.

At the end of the day, this is all about stifling competition for Apple. Their in-app purchasing wasn’t designed to handle this sort of thing. It copes with only very small catalogs, and was designed to enable small developers to easily make nuggets of content or functionality available for additional purchase. In fact, when it was first unveiled, free applications were NOT ALLOWED to use this: “free apps remain free” as Steve Jobs said when he announced it.

Those anti-trust investigations are starting to look more and more certain.

6Jan/110

Some info about the Mac App Store and updating software from a developer

RedSweaterLogo.pngI use Red Sweater’s MarsEdit to post to TeleRead and it is a wonderful piece of software. It’s creator, Daniel Jalkut, has just posted a series of Q&As about the store that have info I haven’t seen anywhere else. While they relate to his software, I believe that his answers will be universally applicable.

I already own your software, how can I migrate my purchase to the Mac App Store?

So far Apple has not indicated that there will be any mechanism to migrate existing paid customers into the Mac App Store update process. For existing customers, my applications will continue to receive regular updated outside of the App Store mechanism. I hope that Apple will come up with a solution to allow us to migrate folks who prefer the App Store into that workflow.

Some of you may have noticed that apps from some companies show up in the App Store app as “Installed” even though you purchased them outside of the App Store. I believe this is a quirk in the way the App Store works, and for example you will not be able to review or update these apps through the store. In a nutshell: the App Store app is confused into thinking that you bought the app through Apple, and this is causing many customers to believe that developers have found a way to “migrate” them onto the store. I don’t believe this is the case.

Is the Mac App Store version different from the version I can download from your site?

The Mac App Store and site versions are identical in core functionality and features, but there are minor differences having to do primarily with the update mechanism. The version I sell directly still updates itself, while the version from Apple can only be updated by Apple and is dependent on Apple’s approval schedule.

I have an older version of your software, can I get upgrade pricing on the Mac App Store?

At this time the Mac App Store does not allow for variable pricing based on customer qualification such as a previous purchase. Discounted upgrade prices are still offered from our own store.

Is it possible to download a trial of your software before I commit to buying it on the Mac App Store?

The Mac App Store doesn’t have an official mechanism for downloading trial versions of software, but you can download the standard trial version of my applications from the respective product pages. If you decide to purchase the application on the Mac App Store, you will be able to download and install a separate, authorized copy from Apple through the App Store interface.

20Dec/100

Free iOS developer books available in the iBookstore

images.jpegThere are six free books available:

1. Cocoal Fundamentals
2. iOS Application Programming
3. Object-Oriented Programming with Objective-C
4. The Objective-C Programming Language
5. iOS Human Interface Guidelines
6. iOS Technology Overview

More info at Mediobistro.