Ebooks on Crack Get your ebook fix.

12May/110

Jeff Bezos talks about possible Tablet and concerns over adKindles

CONSUMER REPORTS TALKS WITH JEFF BEZOS

"Asked today about the possibility of Amazon launching a multipurpose tablet device, the company's president and CEO Jeff Bezos said to “stay tuned” on the company’s plans.  In an interview at Consumer Reports' offices, Bezos also signaled that any such device, should it come, is more likely to supplement than to supplant the Kindle, which he calls Amazon’s “purpose-built e-reading device.”

I'd prefer the words "would supplement" to "more likely" ... but he's likely being cagy with the "should it come" that Consumer Reports' Editor, Paul Reynolds, reports.

Bezos added, "We will always be very mindful that we will want a dedicated reading device,” he said. “In terms of any other product introductions, I shouldn’t answer."

There's a video of another talk with CR yesterday.   Pressing 'play' on it may not work.  If not, just move the pointer forward a bit.  I haven't listened to it yet.  Kindle-Blog edition readers won't be able to use this video link on a Kindle and will need to view it on a computer, smartphone with data plan, or tablet.
  It's a pretty lively conversation, from what I can see.


  Re the new ad-subsidized Kindle With Special Offers and ads of course, CR reports that Bezos said it shouldn’t be interpreted as a stepping stone to a future Kindle that’s more multipurpose or that allows e-commerce to intrude on the reading experience.

  Re Library Lending, Bezos didn't feel he could say more than “sometime this year” for when library lending would be available on the Kindle.  "But he did say that users should expect a lineup of titles that’s at least comparable to those available for competing devices that support library e-books."

 In Len Edgerly's conversation with Jay Marine the other day, it seemed that "by the end of the year" was brought up.  The last time I heard that phrase used (and it was for Kindle book loans between Kindle owners), it was finally announced as ready on Dec. 31, so I wouldn't count on it being any sooner.  It'd be nice to be surprised though.

  CR reports that Bezos said again that Color E Ink “is not ready for prime time…the colors are very pale.” And Reynolds notes that 'he added that “it continues to be improved” and “it makes a lot of sense for there to be a low-power, reflective color display.  I think that’s something you could build a fantastic product around.”

  Well, I don't think they can afford to wait for that before offering a color tablet.  Quite obviously they're working on one, and I'll be adding more on the possibilities soon.

Kindle 3's   (UK: Kindle 3's),   K3 Special, 4   DX Graphite


Check often: Temporarily-free late-listed non-classics or recently published ones
  Guide to finding Free Kindle books and Sources.  Top 100 free bestsellers.
UK-Only: recently published non-classics, bestsellers, or £5 Max ones
    Also, UK customers should see the UK store's Top 100 free bestsellers.

12May/110

Interview with DeGruyter CEO, Sven Fund, about DeGruyter ebooks, by Sue Polanka

Nsr cover

Yesterday I spoke with Dr. Sven Fund, the CEO of DeGruyter.  News to me,DeGruyter has been publishing for 262 years! We discussed DeGruyter’s ebook program including their e-ditions program.  E-ditions provides “on demand” requests for digital or print copies of thousands of backlist titles. Listen to the interview here.

Over 30 interviews with librarians, publishers, aggregators, and others in the information industry are available on the NSR interviews page.


Via Sue Polanka’s No Shelf Required blog

11May/110

More parents lenient about young Web use: poll|Lastest Ipad News]

More parents lenient about young Web use: poll
A girl views a new iPad tablet computer at an Apple store during its UK launch in central London May 28, 2010. (REUTERS) NEW YORK (Reuters) - Despite age restrictions on some social media sites, the number of U.S. parents who would allow children 10-12 years old to have a Facebook or MySpace account has doubled in a year, a new survey showed. Seventeen percent of U.S. parents questioned in the ...
Read more on Manila Bulletin


11May/110

More news about Dutch eLinea – going global

Elinea logo2

We reported on thelauch of eLinea earlier.  Now it looks as if they are going global.  From their blog:

Fleur Stigter writes about new online publishing initiatives and critically examined eLinea in an extensive article. Stigter: “since February the Dutch have access to a unique news service [...] and important Dutch publishers are very willing to participate.” She wonders: will eLinea sweep international news organisations off their feet?

In her article Fleur gives a detailled overview of the development of eLinea and how the service works. What does eLinea offer to participating publishers and what does the subscription model look like? And what are the results so far in The Netherlands? She also spoke with Michel Suijkerbuijk, owner of eReaders Groep, the young and independent company behind eLinea. He motivates why eLinea suits his way of doing business: he wishes to help start projects that benefit environment, society and economy.

Fleur also researched the current situation of eLinea in The Netherlands and assessed among others the results so far and the online buzz. She also noticed that we, eReaders Groep, are very clear and confident about our international ambitions. Before this summer we expect to enter the Flemish market and we are also busy preparing the launch of two English eLinea platforms, one for the British market and one for the European market. The public launch of eLinea.com is scheduled for October 1, 2011. Publishers who are interested in issuing their digital content through eLinea are invited to participate in the international pilot scheme.

Read the full article of Fleur Stigter on Tell Fleur.

Thanks to @NatasjaO for the heads up.

10May/110

Interview with Lulu CEO about their change in direction

At the World E-Reading Congress in London, paidContent’s Robert Andrews interviewed Lulu CEO about the company’s change in direction.

8May/110

What to know about iTunes’ legal terms|Lastest Ipad News]

What to know about iTunes' legal terms
During Saturday's White House correspondents dinner, "Saturday Night Live's" Seth Meyers jokingly scolded members of Congress for passing legislation they might never ever read. And he did so using a tech metaphor.
Read more on CNN

7May/110

Chinagram – Amazing Ebook App for iPad – Learn all about Chinese writing





Chinagram, a wonderful interactive ebook for the iPad:

ToDo have recently launched a most intriguing interactive ebook for those who wish to understand and learn how the Chinese write….  All those thousands of rather beautiful but confusing characters.

I have had a look at it, and as one who has struggled to learn how to read and write in Chinese, I found it both useful, to the point, accurate and fun as well.  full of background information about how all the various characters evolved over the roughly 4000 years that the Chinese have been writing, how they should be written (the order and direction of the brush strokes) and so on.

A fascinating and useful ebook for anyone interested in this intriguing language.

In the press release they sent me, they describe what this application actually is rather well, so here is how they describe it:

Chinagram is an iPad application that tells the story of Chinese writing, explaining its logic and showing its beauty, sign after sign.
Chinagram blends the fascinating story and aesthetics of Chinese characters with beautifully crafted graphics and a sleek, intuitive user interface.

Based on the book “Chinese Writing” by Yuan Huaqing, a renowned Chinese language professor and translator, Chinagram is not a dictionary, but an annotated history of Chinese writing that will show you how to see beyond the elegance of the characters to understand their origin and rationale.
Each character is either a beautiful example of calligraphic art and a distillation of China’s history and traditional culture.
Chinagram includes a historical and a linguistic overview, which will help you understand how Chinese writing has changed over the centuries and what are its basic rules today.
With Chinagram you can approach Chinese by discovering the meaning and the evolution of over 120 symbols chosen among the most representative ones. For each symbol you can read an in-depth explanation, including examples of how each word is used today in common idioms and sayings.
You can also listen to its pronunciation and try your hand at tracing your first ideograms right on your iPad’s screen.

When you bear in mind that most educated Chinese may know anything up to 50,000 characters, you begin to understand the complexity of it all – Me, I managed to learn about 100 while living in Beijing, and was pretty pleased with myself for getting that many under my belt, so I am overwhelmed with admiration for all those Chinese kids who learn 50 or so a week.

On the website dedicated to this App, they show you roughly what you will get if you purchase the thing, it is rather beautiful and well worth a visit I think.

 

Chinagram for iPad from todo.to.it on Vimeo.

Chinagram is now available on the App Store at launch price of EUR
2.99 (USD 3.99, GBP 2.39). Full price will be EUR 3.99 (USD 4.99, GBP 3.49).




4May/110

UK blogger complains about e-book price gouging

pound_signThe US isn’t the only place where publisher e-book prices are higher than some consumers would like. While we’ve carried a number of examples where the e-book price was higher than the paper book price, most of them have focused on America. But on his blog nikf.org, Nik Fletcher rants about some British Kindle e-book price gouging.

Fletcher calls back to the Metro article on piracy I mentioned here, and suggests that high pricing might be a contributing factor. He brings up the example of a Jeffrey Archer novel that is priced at £9.99 (£11.99 MSRP) for the Amazon Kindle e-book—but £5.39 (£7.99 MSRP) for the paperback.

Right now, publishers are stinging – or as Fraser more succinctly puts it gouging – eBook customers. I completely understand that there’s costs involved to produce an eBook version of a work. However, when you’re no longer smashing together some (entirely physical) pulp, pressing ink onto it, and shipping it some place, the idea that a premium should apply simply fails logic. The idea of paying substantially more for a digital copy of the exact same text can only be one set up by a publishing house who’ll next year announce stagnant eBook sales – most likely as a result of people looking to buy digital texts thinking “Screw this, I’ll buy the paperback cheap” or resorts to nefarious means.

He suggests that to avoid piracy, publishers should launch books globally from day one (the Harry Potter books do prove it’s possible), and they should be priced commensurately with paper versions. (Publishers had promised this was going to happen when they imposed Agency Pricing, but there seem to be a lot of cases where they just aren’t hitting that goal.)

3May/110

“Have you heard the one about Hitler and Göring standing on top of the Berlin radio tower?”

Or how about the one the starts “Trotsky, Lenin, and Litvinov are walking through a small Russian town…”

For the punch lines of these Nazi-era jokes, you’ll have to read the LA WEEKLY and Flavorwire interviews with Rudolph Herzog, author of Dead Funny: Humor in Hitler’s Germany. Herzog’s book, which came out today, is a remarkable and unexpected new perspective on Nazi-era Germany as seen through the whispered jokes, political cartoons, and underground cabarets that mocked Hitler and the Nazis. Still, as Herzog’s research discovered, a history of political comedy hardly equals true political resistance. “”We have to see an inconvenient truth here,” he tells the LA WEEKLY, “these jokes did not cause an uprising.”

Indeed, the jokes Herzog uncovers are as varied as the layers of a culture, and help delve into the mysteries of an evil age, “a mystery,” Herzog tells Flavorwire, “I needed to get to the bottom to.”

In addition to its lucid insights into the German culture, history, and psychology, Dead Funny abounds with bizarre details and fascinating human stories. For example: the beloved children’s cartoonist E.O. Plauen who was persecuted and driven to suicide for his political cartoons; Werner Finck, a cabaret performer who managed to make fun of the Nazis in such ambiguous fashion and subtle meaning that when he was brought to trial (for “maliciousness”) and forced to repeat his jokes, he could make them seems completely innocent; and Robert Lukas, an Austrian Jew who fled to England and began broadcasting ingenious anti-Nazi radio German-language shows on the BBC, shows that were picked up and listened to by German citizens.

One of Lukas’s popular shows (so popular that Goebbels created films warning German citizens not to listen) consisted of the “letters” a German soldier, “Adolf Hirnnschal,” wrote back to his beloved wife. Though innocent and loyal, Hirnschal’s letters, as read on the air, showed the utter madness of the Nazi plan. Such sly, unsettling, and sharp-edged comedy could only arise from the wickedness of war, and shares qualities with the dark comedy of Joseph Heller or Kurt Vonnegut Jr. Here is a portion of the BBC broadcast from after a failed assassination of Hitler:

Dear Amalia, my beloved wife,

You can’t imagine the commotion among our ranks on

account of the attack against our beloved Führer. Hans-

Joachim Blitz said you can’t believe how suddenly a twist of

fate can happen. If the assassin had put his briefcase a foot-

step to the right or the left, we’d perhaps be enjoying peace

right now. But thankfully Divine Providence intervened…

For the rest of radio routine, and for the rest of the story, you’ll have to read Herzog’s book.

3May/110

“Have you heard the one about Hitler and Göring standing on top of the Berlin radio tower?”

Or how about the one the starts “Trotsky, Lenin, and Litvinov are walking through a small Russian town…”

For the punch lines of these Nazi-era jokes, you’ll have to read the LA WEEKLY and Flavorwire interviews with Rudolph Herzog, author of Dead Funny: Humor in Hitler’s Germany. Herzog’s book, which came out today, is a remarkable and unexpected new perspective on Nazi-era Germany as seen through the whispered jokes, political cartoons, and underground cabarets that mocked Hitler and the Nazis. Still, as Herzog’s research discovered, a history of political comedy hardly equals true political resistance. “”We have to see an inconvenient truth here,” he tells the LA WEEKLY, “these jokes did not cause an uprising.”

Indeed, the jokes Herzog uncovers are as varied as the layers of a culture, and help delve into the mysteries of an evil age, “a mystery,” Herzog tells Flavorwire, “I needed to get to the bottom to.”

In addition to its lucid insights into the German culture, history, and psychology, Dead Funny abounds with bizarre details and fascinating human stories. For example: the beloved children’s cartoonist E.O. Plauen who was persecuted and driven to suicide for his political cartoons; Werner Finck, a cabaret performer who managed to make fun of the Nazis in such ambiguous fashion and subtle meaning that when he was brought to trial (for “maliciousness”) and forced to repeat his jokes, he could make them seems completely innocent; and Robert Lukas, an Austrian Jew who fled to England and began broadcasting ingenious anti-Nazi radio German-language shows on the BBC, shows that were picked up and listened to by German citizens.

One of Lukas’s popular shows (so popular that Goebbels created films warning German citizens not to listen) consisted of the “letters” a German soldier, “Adolf Hirnnschal,” wrote back to his beloved wife. Though innocent and loyal, Hirnschal’s letters, as read on the air, showed the utter madness of the Nazi plan. Such sly, unsettling, and sharp-edged comedy could only arise from the wickedness of war, and shares qualities with the dark comedy of Joseph Heller or Kurt Vonnegut Jr. Here is a portion of the BBC broadcast from after a failed assassination of Hitler:

Dear Amalia, my beloved wife,

You can’t imagine the commotion among our ranks on

account of the attack against our beloved Führer. Hans-

Joachim Blitz said you can’t believe how suddenly a twist of

fate can happen. If the assassin had put his briefcase a foot-

step to the right or the left, we’d perhaps be enjoying peace

right now. But thankfully Divine Providence intervened…

For the rest of radio routine, and for the rest of the story, you’ll have to read Herzog’s book.

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